Toledo Talk

N. Illinois' Jamaal Bass indicted

Not sure I agree with this at all.

http://espn.go.com/chicago/ncf/story/_/id/7712820/jamaal-bass-northern-illinois-huskies-indicted-leveling-toledo-rockets-band-member

created by toledoramblingman on Mar 20, 2012 at 11:52:36 am     Sports     Comments: 38

source      versions


Comments ... #

I think he should get something more than a one game suspension, but felonious assault and eight years max seems kinda steep. imo

posted by steve155 on Mar 20, 2012 at 12:24:04 pm     #  

steve155 posted at 01:24:04 PM on Mar 20, 2012:

I think he should get something more than a one game suspension, but felonious assault and eight years max seems kinda steep. imo

Agree.

I'd have to watch the replay again, because it is a little fuzzy in my mind. But a felonious assault charge does seem steep from my current recollection.

posted by mom2 on Mar 20, 2012 at 12:28:49 pm     #  

From the UT paper when it happened:

http://www.independentcollegian.com/the-band-is-out-on-the-field-1.2664600#.T2jGGfWwVds

Four band members sustained injuries and were examined by emergency medical personnel afterward.

Students injured include Tara Findley, a senior mellophone player, Alex Hritz, a freshman piccolo player, as well as Ashley Gawle and Carolyn Hiner, both freshmen clarinet players.

Hirtz said it looked as though the players were waiting until the band members were exiting the field before they charged on, but he wasn't sure.

Hirtz was injured when a player's shoulder pad went into his cheek, causing him to fall over and hit his head on the turf.

Hirtz said the Northern Illinois coach helped him up and he could see players smiling as they looked on, even though he was still disoriented from the fall.

Hiner said she could also see other football players smiling through their facemasks.

"I can understand if a football player gets in the zone," Hirtz said. "I was a band member just getting off the field. I wasn't doing anything to provoke them."

Since falling, Hirtz said he has had a constant, dull headache which he will have checked out today at Toledo Hospital.

Hiner has had a constant throbbing behind her eyes and a sore nose which she also plans to seek medical attention for.

--

Taking a charging football player in full gear to the face when you're wearing nothing but polyester is going to cause some injuries.

posted by taliesin52 on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:06:20 pm     #  

When you are bigger, stronger, faster, and armored up you carry more responsibility. It's called disparity in force and the player will have trouble claiming a "mistake" here.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:21:55 pm     #   1 person liked this

I totally agree with the indictment. The band members are not football players, and therefore did not assume any of the risks associated with playing a contact game of football. This is absolutely no different than doing this to a random person at any location.

This was a crime that no amount of game suspensions make up for. Felonious assault per the ORC: "knowingly cause serious physical harm to another." Yep, jumping at someone and putting your shoulder into their face should cover that. Make an example of him.

posted by brainswell on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:30:37 pm     #   1 person liked this

Not only do I agree with the indictment, I hope the jerk has to do some serious time. I'm sure his fellow inmates will see to it he enjoys his stay.

posted by Foodie on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:54:21 pm     #  

OK, so here's the video in slow mo:

You can see NIU players on the left doing their best to avoid the band. Then you can see Bass on the right jumping up and smashing the band member in the face with his shoulder pad. Looks pretty deliberate to me....

posted by Ace_Face on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:58:24 pm     #  

If this had happened on the street and the guy was not wearing football gear, I doubt anyone would disagree with the indictment. The kid who took the worst of it was purposely attacked - Bass jumps up and leans in with his shoulder to get a better hit. I don't know if they will be able to make the case against Bass, but the indictment is appropriate.

This not a case like the Stanford band from so many years ago. The UT kids were taking the stands as they were supposed to before the game. Whether or not the NIU squad was let into the field is irrelevant. There is no reason Bass could not have avoided that collision. Somehow, every other player on the field managed to move through and around the band members without major incident.

posted by MoreThanRhetoric on Mar 20, 2012 at 01:58:57 pm     #  

And kudos to the band kid who jumps in front of the fallen player to shield him from getting trampled. Not too many "band geeks" or anyone else would have the stones to get in front of a group of much bigger and stronger football players.

posted by MoreThanRhetoric on Mar 20, 2012 at 02:02:50 pm     #  

And you can clearly see the smiles on the faces of other players. Sure glad this makes them all feel like "real men" and proud of themselves.

F'n jerks.

posted by Foodie on Mar 20, 2012 at 02:19:22 pm     #  

Some pretty eye-opening comments on espn.com...mainly calling the Toledo band members pussies and idiots that shouldn't be a part of the game experience. Oh, and it's that band kid's fault. Entirely.

A sampling from the last 30 minutes:

They shouldn't even of been on the field. Stupid band kids.

keep the band off of the field, it is a football field where players play

I just watched the video again, the damn band was not trying to get out of the way. They were still on the feld when the team came out

Don't step onto a football field for ANY reason if you're a $@%!$... period

SO......Who is this band player's parents??? and how much money did they spend to get those type of charges for something as simple as a football player being excited about a game?

just saw the video on youtube, are you kidding me? tell that band geek to grow some balls. what a girl

Tell the band members to grow some balls, or move the $@%! out of the way. lol

------------

I love sports. Some of the "fans" are fucking revolting.

posted by oldhometown on Mar 20, 2012 at 02:46:42 pm     #   1 person liked this

"Most of the "fans" are fucking revolting." - Fixed it for you.

I've seen bags of urine dumped from Ohio St. fans on to Spartan fans in Columbus. In '96 I watched some Red Sox fans get curb stomped in the Bronx after a fight broke out about bean balls being thrown in the game.

Remember Fan is short for fanatic.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 20, 2012 at 02:54:32 pm     #  

AT the very least he should have been tossed off the team ....IF the coach was truly embarrassed and not just covering his ass.

posted by JeepMaker on Mar 20, 2012 at 03:16:05 pm     #  

What Bass did was idiotic, malicious, and reckless, but I think misdemeanor assault (ORC 2903.13) makes more sense than felony assault (ORC 2903.11). The grand jury seems to have agreed that the "serious physical harm" (felonious assault) occurred with intent to harm, as opposed to the recklessness associated with misdemeanor assault.

Perhaps the more serious charge is a setup to a plea bargain to misdemeanor assault.

Anyway, Bass may be a jackass, and an idiot, and a mean-spirited punk, but an 8-year prison sentence for this action seems excessive. I think paying restitution to the victims and doing community service would bring more useful long term results than locking the jerk up for a few years.

Heck: Donte Stallworth only served 24 days of a 30-day sentence in a DUI death he caused. Of course, Stallworth is an NFL star making millions who could afford a high-powered attorney, while Bass is just a freshman linebacker at a MAC school who is probably scraping by on change he finds in the couch cushions.

posted by historymike on Mar 20, 2012 at 03:47:08 pm     #  

What Bass did was idiotic, malicious, and reckless, but I think misdemeanor assault (ORC 2903.13) makes more sense than felony assault (ORC 2903.11). The grand jury seems to have agreed that the "serious physical harm" (felonious assault) occurred with intent to harm, as opposed to the recklessness associated with misdemeanor assault.

Perhaps the more serious charge is a setup to a plea bargain to misdemeanor assault.

That was along the lines of what I was thinking.

I'm not defending or condoning the behavior, just wondering if felonious assault is the appropriate charge.

Guess we'll see how it plays out in court (or plea bargaining)...

posted by mom2 on Mar 20, 2012 at 03:56:50 pm     #  

Appropriate depends on your definition. It fits the facts as best as I can tell from just the video and the scant statements available in the media. As for appropriate in the long-term sense, probably not. But, as HM points out, the most likely reason for the F2 charge is to leverage a plea bargain.

posted by MoreThanRhetoric on Mar 20, 2012 at 04:08:06 pm     #  

A football player gets felonious assault for "smashing" into a band member while a so-called neighborhood watch group leader gets away with murdering a Black resident of the gated community? Only in America...

posted by MrsPhoenix on Mar 21, 2012 at 10:53:04 am     #  

Giving some context to the above post.

BTW, I don't think he is "getting away with it". It's still way to early to make that statement.

posted by oldhometown on Mar 21, 2012 at 12:01:30 pm     #  

Only in America (or Ms.Pheonix Land) can racism declare someone guilty before a trail.

Don't hear you screaming about lots of people not going to jail for the all the black on black violence that ends up taking the lives of young African Americans. One nutty white person takes the life of a trespasser on HIS property and HuffPo/MSNBC covers it till it's blue in the face, dozens if not hundreds that are killed or hurt in urban violence every day and it's not front page news. Bands of people roam our cites with violence on their mind but but not a peep out of you. BTW 100 people in Chicago alone this year...

Nice straw man argument.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 21, 2012 at 12:25:22 pm     #  

Only in America (or Ms.Pheonix Land) can racism declare someone guilty before a trail.

I think people just want there to be a trial.

If Zimmerman gets acquitted, then so be it. But people are in an uproar about the fact that (thus far) no charges have been brought.

posted by mom2 on Mar 21, 2012 at 12:32:05 pm     #  

dbw - I'm going to guess that you aren't familiar with the case that Mrs. Phoenix mentioned.

There was no tresspassing involved.

posted by mom2 on Mar 21, 2012 at 12:33:07 pm     #  

If he took the life of this kid in cold blood trying to be neighborhood super detective then he needs to get the chair. No excuses for shooting kids because they make you "scared", if he was home watching TV or working in his lawn this kid would be alive today. Not making excuses for a possible killer.

I'm just sick of this fury when one white guy makes a "mistake" and the Media runs it up a tree for weeks at a time and screams "JUSTICE" or "what a tragedy" but countless African American lives are lost each year to violence by other African Americans and Sharpton isn't all over HuffPo preaching racism. Can find 7 instances of black on black murder in the last 24 hours on the internet, why is no one crying for these souls? Would it be because MSNBC doesn't devote countless hours too it?

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 21, 2012 at 01:30:22 pm     #  

As someone has already said, the Florida Block watch case is far from done. I'm not sure why there is an argument that Lucas County was so quick to charge while the Florida officials are dragging their feet. It has been months since both incidents occurred. Lucas County has just now brought charges after a lengthy period and it appears that the Florida officials are about to do the same.

Even IF the guy in Florida is not indicted, that has nothing to do with the UT case. If he is NOT indicted, that would be a travesty, without question. However, I would be just as upset if the kid from NIU got to walk away with nothing more than a suspension from a football game. Why should a 'smallish' crime go unpunished just because authorities in another part of the country failed to properly address a larger one?

posted by MoreThanRhetoric on Mar 21, 2012 at 01:35:27 pm     #   1 person liked this

Really dwb? If MSNBC hadn’t devoted the time, the justice department wouldn’t have been involved. Also do you think if some black guy shot a while teenage girl walking down the street and claimed self-defense the police would have shrugged and said “ok”.

To add to even more how f’d up this case is, there is good indication the police tampered with witnesses and didn’t even make an effort to find out who the dead boy was even though he had his cell phone on him. The dead boy was at the morgue, his cell phone in police evidence and his parents calling 911 to report their boy missing and it took three days for the police to identify the boy with his parents wondering where he went.

posted by SensorG on Mar 21, 2012 at 01:53:58 pm     #  

Hopefully Jamaal Bass did not get an incorrect W2 from UT, that might have sparked his anger at band members

posted by Hoops on Mar 21, 2012 at 02:01:42 pm     #   2 people liked this

DBW8906 the reason people don't protest black on black crime is because the police usually act upon them, if the suspect is known they are arrested. The white on black crime becomes a big issue when it is perceived by the public as being handled differently than a black on black crime or a black on white crime. The law and justice should be color blind, and when its not it should be protested. The case in Florida needed protested, the shooter should have been arrested and processed and if self defense was indeed the reason for the shooting (hard to believe since the guy doing the shooting followed him and tried to illegally detain him, after the police told him not to follow him)the court should decide, not the police.
As for this thread with the football player, he intentionally hit an unsuspecting physically inferior person for no reason and without provocation, there is no excuse for his behavior, and it was the correct thing to charge him with a F2, which most likely will be pled down, but I hope he does do at least some time..

posted by roygbiv on Mar 21, 2012 at 03:29:55 pm     #  

NIU linebacker Jamaal Bass indicted on assault charge in Ohio

Bass was indicted Friday by a grand jury in Lucas County, Ohio, on one count of felony assault and one count of misdemeanor assault...

The felony charge is likely due to the equipment Bass was wearing, similar to a hockey player fighting with his gloves on which is assault with a deadly weapon. If the band members didn't sustain serious injuries the whole thing will likely be pled down to a misdemeanor. For his mean spirited stunt he ought to be kicked to the curb.

As for the Trayvon Martin case, Martin was suspended from school when he got shot, proving he's no choir boy. George Zimmerman (the shooter) has a Florida CCW license which means he passed a Federal background check. He also had a history of calling everything in to the police.

Since there isn't any video evidence or eyewitnesses to the shooting, about the only thing to do is ask Zimmerman what happened and see if the circumstantial evidence fits, and so far it appears to be self-defense. I don't think this case will ever see the inside of a courtroom, as the Florida law tends to protect people who defend themselves.

posted by madjack on Mar 21, 2012 at 04:41:07 pm     #  

I'm sorry I disagree with the statement of "black on black crime is acted upon by the Police". I know several Detroit Police officers (handle city business now and then) and most homicides are no more than a show up and then "bag and tag" procedures, it would be my guess that less than 50% of them are followed up on. They just don't have the resources and the "snitches get stitches" mentality carried by most residents prevents investigation. This is not CSI and a sweet tech equipped crime lab until does not show up at the scene like you see on TV.

Too many lives in this country are lost to random violence, I just wish the the media would shed the light on it as much as the grand standing they have done on this case. Black men murder other Black Americans around the clock and there is no media fury about bad police work or "justice" on 99.9% of the cases. Rachel Maddow isn't devoting a 30 minute segment on them.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 22, 2012 at 05:58:28 am     #  

As for the Trayvon Martin case, Martin was suspended from school when he got shot, proving he's no choir boy.

An administrator from his school clarified that to the media.

His suspension was because of tardiness.

The school representative specifically stated to the media that he was not a troublemaker or behavior issue at school.

(Yes, in order to be suspended, he must have accumulated a lot of tardies. But that in and of itself doesn't mean he was a "bad kid" either.)

posted by mom2 on Mar 22, 2012 at 07:24:27 am     #  

I'm a big supporter of laws like castle doctrine and stand your ground, but what bothers me, is this Zimmerman guy was told by dispatchers NOT to follow the kid and he did anyway. That doesn't sound so much like standing your ground as trying to start a confrontation.

The other thing that bugs me is hundreds of thousands of people screaming for Zimmermans head when you know they don't know any more about the case than we do.

posted by JeepMaker on Mar 22, 2012 at 08:57:17 am     #   1 person liked this

His suspension was because of tardiness.

There should be a lot more to it than that, but I've got a nasty feeling that there isn't. Suspend a student for being tardy? What are they, stupid? Really, really stupid? What?

911 dispatch told Zimmerman something to the effect of 'you don't need to do that'. Dispatch operators are not law officers and so do not have the authority to issue a lawful order to anyone - except maybe their own spouse. Seriously, Zimmerman didn't have to do anything.

The black community sees Zimmerman as being white and so are screaming for "justice". The commercial news media needs news and so is out to hang Zimmerman. My feeling is that if there was any evidence or witnesses that might prove this shooting was something other than self-defense, Zimmerman would be in the hoosegow. He isn't.

I wish we had an identical law in Ohio.

posted by madjack on Mar 22, 2012 at 05:38:32 pm     #  

I'm a NRA & GOA member, I often write my Representatives and work with firearms non-profit groups to protect and strengthen 2A related issues, but I have a hard time backing Mr. Zimmerman in this case.

He was not in his home, and if he would have stayed on the line with 911 or even followed the kid in his car both he and Mr. Martin would be alive today. I do believe Mr. Martin was up to "no good" but Mr. Zimmerman escalated the situation by confronting Mr. Martin. He was not "standing his ground" nor did Mr. Martin bring the fight to him, Mr. Zimmerman CHOOSE to confront someone he believed was committing a crime while armed. You can't claim Stand your Ground when you escalte or futher the confrontation.

I'm a member of our block watch and I have often followed miscreants in my car while on the phone with TPD. But if you want to confront someone actively committing a crime then carry mace, a taser, or bear spray. Or better yet become a cop.

Don't really see how confronting someone is "self defense".

From: http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/03/21/do-stand-your-ground-laws-encourage-vigilantes/what-the-florida-stand-your-ground-law-says

Florida legislators, however, insist the Stand Your Ground law does not provide a defense for people like Zimmerman, who pursue and confront someone. Florida Senator Durrell Peadon, who sponsored the law, said that Zimmerman “has no protection under my law.” According to state Representative Dennis Baxley, “There’s nothing in this statute that authorizes you to pursue and confront people.” The law, Baxley notes, was designed only “to prevent you from being attacked by other people.”

If guilty he deserves the chair.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 23, 2012 at 05:34:18 am     #  

I really don't believe the NIU player deserves a felony conviction for what he did. However, I do think a year in jail is appropriate.

Too many college and pro athletes completely get away with unacceptable behavior.

posted by 6th_Floor on Mar 23, 2012 at 05:50:41 am     #  

"I do believe Mr. Martin was up to "no good""

So if I am walking through my gated community towards my home WHICH IS INSIDE MY GATED COMMUNITY that means I am "up to no good"?!

posted by MrsPhoenix on Mar 23, 2012 at 07:11:11 am     #  

There should be a lot more to it than that, but I've got a nasty feeling that there isn't. Suspend a student for being tardy? What are they, stupid? Really, really stupid? What?

Isn't that crazy?

But I believe it. It would appear that a high school student in the Sylvania school system could be suspended for only tardiness. (The policy says "Wednesday school," which I'm interpreting as an in-school suspension.)

According to the handbook, you get a demerit point for your 4th and subsequent tardy. "Wednesday school" happens on the 3rd demerit point.

Unless I'm misinterpreting the policy, a Sylvania high school student who was tardy 7 times in a semester would have an in-school suspension.

posted by mom2 on Mar 23, 2012 at 08:02:14 am     #  

MrsPhoenix posted at 08:11:11 AM on Mar 23, 2012:

"I do believe Mr. Martin was up to "no good""

So if I am walking through my gated community towards my home WHICH IS INSIDE MY GATED COMMUNITY that means I am "up to no good"?!

Because I'm giving Mr. Zimmerman the benefit of the doubt that he is was a concerned citizen and not a KKK killing spree clan leader. I think he was stupid to approach the victim, but at that time he got scared and dived even further into the stupid pool. No I don't think we was going out the day looking to shoot a black person for being in his neighborhood.

I've been stopped for being white in a black neighborhood. Enough with the race card, this comes down to a stupid person making a stupid mistake.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 23, 2012 at 08:09:33 am     #  

From dbw8906: Florida Senator Durrell Peadon, who sponsored the law, said that Zimmerman “has no protection under my law.” According to state Representative Dennis Baxley, “There’s nothing in this statute that authorizes you to pursue and confront people.” The law, Baxley notes, was designed only “to prevent you from being attacked by other people.”

Just what do you expect them to say? They're elected officials and the commercial media is doing the best they can to tar and feather Zimmerman prior to his fair trial and fine hanging. If these invertebrates want to retain their position at the Florida hog trough, they know exactly what it is they have to do: castigate Zimmerman at every opportunity, grab every single free sound bite they can and scream and screed and bluster until this thing dies some sort of death.

If you believe ABC news, when police finally arrived they discovered Zimmerman with a bloody nose, a wound in the back of his head and a handgun with one round gone. Clearly Zimmerman had been attacked, likely by Trayvon Martin who was now approaching ambient temperature. The way Florida law reads, this case is now closed as self-defense.

The worst part about this entire case is the way the commercial news media is portraying it. If you believe the media, this isn't just one single case; this is one out of millions that are happening (or just waiting to happen) everywhere in the US.

posted by madjack on Mar 23, 2012 at 09:30:26 am     #  

MJ I would agree with you a 100%, but Mr. Martin got out of his car and escalated the situation. He is a criminal justice student, not a police officer.

posted by dbw8906 on Mar 23, 2012 at 11:08:34 am     #