Toledo Talk

New Career...

What's the job search like out there? Been thinking of changing it up...

created by jim30529 on Feb 04, 2013 at 06:02:59 pm     Business     Comments: 34

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For anything professional in marketing...horrific. A lot of sales positions are job scams / commission only high turn over crap as well.

posted by OhioKimono on Feb 04, 2013 at 06:05:43 pm     #   1 person liked this

I have noticed that Volunteer positions are being listed like they are real paying jobs. Cracks me up.

posted by Molsonator on Feb 04, 2013 at 06:16:03 pm     #  

Any details about what kind of job you're interested in searching for would probably help people give more precise answers. For instance, an entry-level position at a hardware store is probably pretty getable. CEO of Google... there's probably a waiting list or something, so that would be tougher.

posted by Johio83 on Feb 04, 2013 at 06:16:33 pm     #   1 person liked this

I think the job market here is still in the dumps for many.

3 years ago my granddaughter who needed to clerk for an attorney while in law school had to pay for that privilege here in Toledo. My grandson, a junior at UC Berkley in Electrical/Computer engineering has a job making $34/hr as an intern while in school.

My guess is you have to leave this area and go at least west of the Mississippi to have much chance of a job today.

posted by jackie on Feb 04, 2013 at 10:58:38 pm     #  

$34/hr as an intern, Holy Crap that's almost 2x as I make as an IT manager.

They hiring?

posted by INeedCoffee on Feb 04, 2013 at 11:03:10 pm     #  

INeedCoffee posted at 10:03:10 PM on Feb 04, 2013:

$34/hr as an intern, Holy Crap that's almost 2x as I make as an IT manager.

They hiring?

Someone in IT who has it crappier than I do, and a manager no less.

Wow.

posted by anonymouscoward on Feb 04, 2013 at 11:05:36 pm     #  

Skill is a necessity. Specific, difficult skill _is even more favorable for better earnings. The chances of finding a good paying job are almost zero when the posting reads : _No experience necessary, High School Diploma required.

The people that I see succeeding are the ones who went for the more difficult college degrees rather then the ones that were more generic.

If I were contemplating a new career I would acquire that skill or college degree while still working at my present career. I think it is admirable for anyone to try something different though, especially if they are not satisfied where they are.

posted by Danneskjold on Feb 04, 2013 at 11:09:32 pm     #  

Hey Molson ... unbelievably, when I applied for a job online I had to fill in the blanks with info about duties, skills, responsibilities etc. for whatever I'd been doing in a certain field, whether volunteer or paid position. The work was considered to be equivalent. I was surprised, to say the least. But that just about doubled my career "experience" because everything I'd done in my free time became professionalized. That might be why some volunteer opportunities are now listed like job openings. If I were unemployed and looking to get into an industry, I'd be begging for a compatible volunteer slot :(

posted by viola on Feb 05, 2013 at 08:30:42 am     #  

Molsonator posted at 05:16:03 PM on Feb 04, 2013:

I have noticed that Volunteer positions are being listed like they are real paying jobs. Cracks me up.

Some volunteers pet dogs.

Some volunteers run multi-million dollar organizations, set and approve the budget, evaluate the director, carry B and O insurance, and sign the checks.

posted by justread on Feb 05, 2013 at 08:46:52 am     #  

Jim - Are you looking for a new job or a new career?

i.e. Doing the same thing you're doing now, somewhere else or are looking to do something else?

posted by SensorG on Feb 05, 2013 at 09:05:49 am     #  

"3 years ago my granddaughter who needed to clerk for an attorney while in law school had to pay for that privilege here in Toledo. "

Why did she 'need' to clerk for an attorney? I went to law school and I didn't need to do this. And by paying for it, do you mean she paid for college credits so that the time clerking went toward her degree? Or she actually had to pay the attorney for the privilege of working in his office?

This is just something I had not heard about, though admittedly not active in legal practice currently.

posted by MrsArcher on Feb 05, 2013 at 09:51:39 am     #  

MrsArcher

Per my understanding with a 22 year old.

She received no compensation and there was a small fee for the course. I had a daughter who went to a coop school in engineering and she had to pay for the right to work every other quarter. I assumed it was the same thing.

posted by jackie on Feb 05, 2013 at 02:12:55 pm     #  

Okay, that's makes sense - she didn't pay the attorney for the privilege of working, but she was not paid and then paid for the college credits she received for the work experience.

posted by MrsArcher on Feb 05, 2013 at 02:28:58 pm     #  

I think it is pretty typical to pay the school for the credit hours you receive for a for-credit internship.

It was that way when I went to college, and I graduated in a decent job market.

posted by mom2 on Feb 05, 2013 at 03:01:08 pm     #  

jim - I might be getting you confused with someone else, but were you the one who was considering a move to the West Coast at one point?

posted by mom2 on Feb 05, 2013 at 03:03:04 pm     #  

I'm in an "encore" career. We sold our businesses ending a 35 year run in financial services and retailing. Even went so far as to get an associates degree in a field totally different from my bachelors. I graduate this coming May. Also a senior. All the way through this transition I was firmly convinced I'd never find work in my field. Age - no experience, yada, yada, yada. When it came time to look for internship employment I had several good offers. I did a split internship - for pay - at two different entities. Even more to my surprise both offered me employment after the internship. Nobody has been more surprised than me. I am working in my new field now. So I guess my advice is you don't know until you try.

posted by holland on Feb 05, 2013 at 03:29:51 pm     #   2 people liked this

Great story, holland! I have had students as old as 80 in my classes in the past few years, and while most of the seniors are there simply to learn, a few were pursuing degrees to go intoa later-life career. One man in his late sixties was working on a divinity degree to become an ordained preacher, while another was working on an education degree in his mid-60s.

I also should add that students in their sixties and beyond make the classroom much more vibrant, as they often bring a wealth of interesting perspectives. I taught a modern Euuope survey course a few years ago at UT where there was a husband and wife couple as audit students. Much to my surprise, when we got around to WWII in the class the woman began talking one day about being a child in Germany in 1944 and 1945 and what it was like to grow up near Berlin with the daily threat of aerial attack from Allied planes. She had riveting anecdotes about bomb shelters and the sounds and smells of nearby explosions, experiences that I - as an American who has never directly experienced war - cannot share with students.

posted by historymike on Feb 05, 2013 at 05:27:15 pm     #  

Some things you just can't get from a book. This is off topic, but I wish more families would record the oral histories of their parents and grandparents. Get the video camera out, set the folks down and record what they did in life. Let them tell their story.

posted by holland on Feb 05, 2013 at 08:24:22 pm     #  

holland

You are so right on the above. My mother immigrated here to America as a small child and did not learn English till the 3rd grade. When she died there was a wealth of information about her family that no one here could read and pictures of people we had no idea who they were. The writings were in a dialect most here could not read nor understand with letters we no longer use.

I think people of my parents generation were very private and it was hard to get them to talk about the past or the present. Write it down and tell your children. We are the history of tomorrow and need to tell our stories.

posted by jackie on Feb 05, 2013 at 11:18:57 pm     #  

Was she German Jackie?

posted by Linecrosser on Feb 06, 2013 at 06:18:51 pm     #  

As much as I dont want to hijack this thread I must say that's an interesting question. My Grandmother was Czech. She became a naturalized citizen. No one ever recorded her history from the old country. She didnt want to talk about it. Tracing our family back on her side has been extremely difficult. She came with her younger sister when she was just 17 and started a new life for herself. I can only imagine what stories she might have told. I dont even understand how she got into this country without a sponsor and at such a young age. But she did. She met and married a man from the old country who was already here in Cleveland. They raised a family of the hardest working, most responsible people you could ever imagine. Talk about a work ethic. They personified it. It carried through to me and to my children. That was her gift to me and to this country - the value of work.

posted by holland on Feb 06, 2013 at 07:07:50 pm     #  

Sorry about the hijack jim30529.

posted by holland on Feb 06, 2013 at 07:08:37 pm     #  

LC

My mother, siblings and parents came here from Holland. They moved to America for the free farm land in South Dakota. My grandfather died young on the farm and the family was headed to a Dutch community in MI when the car had an accident. So they ended up here in Toledo instead.

posted by jackie on Feb 06, 2013 at 07:24:48 pm     #  

Ok I know some of the German letters, I bet every old country had some of them.

posted by Linecrosser on Feb 06, 2013 at 10:09:10 pm     #  

=double s
, , , ,
also the script "t" has a curl in the middle bottom with no horizontal bar. There are a couple others that I don't remember. I am sure Holland had their own unique variations. The letters with 2 dots on top had their own unique pronunciations and I think the double s was just for convenience.

posted by Linecrosser on Feb 07, 2013 at 01:15:56 pm     #  

I think Dutch might be considered low German by some people. I speak neither but as a kid could understand it well.

posted by jackie on Feb 07, 2013 at 01:16:33 pm     #  

German is the language of beer, the more you drink the more sense it makes. I spent 2 years over there thanks to the US Army, had one hell of a time.

posted by Linecrosser on Feb 07, 2013 at 01:30:03 pm     #  

I had two years of German in college. I could read and write it fine, but never got an ear for it. I could get a beer, find the bathroom or get my face slapped, but that was about it.

posted by SensorG on Feb 07, 2013 at 01:58:15 pm     #  

That's still more useful than my four years of Latin.

posted by holland on Feb 07, 2013 at 02:13:14 pm     #   1 person liked this

^habes, quod recte soror

posted by justareviewer on Feb 08, 2013 at 11:54:21 am     #  

Not that I'm bragging .... but... my grandson who attends UC-Berkley just got a summer intern job at Google. Horace Greeley was right - go west young men. That's where the jobs are now.

posted by jackie on Feb 10, 2013 at 07:38:31 pm     #  

Congratulations to your grandson, Jackie. His family should be very proud of him.

posted by madjack on Feb 11, 2013 at 10:47:52 am     #  

We are.

posted by jackie on Feb 11, 2013 at 12:04:56 pm     #  

Congrats!

posted by holland on Feb 11, 2013 at 07:01:49 pm     #