Toledo Talk

Front Page Blade editorial

This morning the printed Blade had a front page editorial scolding several hospital systems and the Lucas County Health Department for not releasing information on flu deaths in Lucas County. It was even alleged that this refusal might be illegal.

May I suggest that they helped create this problem. Years ago they approved of the health department's Dr. Grossman as he passed and started to enforce an illegal law that disallowed smoking in bars and restaurants. Of course that was because his actions were in keeping with the Blade's anti-smoking crusade. Bar owners, specifically Arnie Elzey, sued and got the law thrown out because Grossman was not empowered to pass such a law.

Now that Grossman is not giving them exactly what they want, they publish a front page editorial accusing him of participating in secrecy that is not only "unwarranted and irresponsible" but they also accuse him / his department of not acting legally.

Not acting legally - no shit. Grossman's has a history of not acting legally.

The Blade should take a page from Arnie's book and sue him to force him to function in a legal manner.

created by jimavolt on Jan 15, 2014 at 06:17:38 pm     Media     Comments: 7

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Comments ... #

Be happy.

He is on the wrong side of the Strong Publisher now.
His days are numbered. If Grossman has any dirty laundry, there will be a four-part series.

posted by justread on Jan 15, 2014 at 06:42:03 pm     #   1 person liked this

Doesn't HIPPA effect the information that is released?

posted by shamrock44 on Jan 15, 2014 at 06:44:16 pm     #  

Shamrock, not if it's in the name of public safety. Plus, the Blade published the name of the 5th person to die of flu today, so apparently the patiant and family didn't care about HIPPA, you can sign your privacy rights away. The Health Dept can give out stats and such without releasing the names of the victims, that's not a HIPPA violation. I didn't see see the Blade today, guess I'll go see what they said.

posted by nana on Jan 15, 2014 at 07:14:21 pm     #  

shamrock44 posted at 05:44:16 PM on Jan 15, 2014:

Doesn't HIPPA effect the information that is released?

No. Not in terms of giving out aggregate data, such as the total number of cases or deaths. That's in the interest of public health and doesn't violate an individual's privacy.

Releasing of names in the media without family consent would violate privacy rights. However, given that surviving family members were interviewed for each person who died, I would assume that consent was obtained.

posted by mom2 on Jan 15, 2014 at 09:11:00 pm     #  

mom2 posted at 08:11:00 PM on Jan 15, 2014:
shamrock44 posted at 05:44:16 PM on Jan 15, 2014:

Doesn't HIPPA effect the information that is released?

No. Not in terms of giving out aggregate data, such as the total number of cases or deaths. That's in the interest of public health and doesn't violate an individual's privacy.

Releasing of names in the media without family consent would violate privacy rights. However, given that surviving family members were interviewed for each person who died, I would assume that consent was obtained.

Yep. Aggregate data.

Interestingly, HIPAA protections extend 50 years after death.

posted by justread on Jan 15, 2014 at 09:59:19 pm     #  

Thanks for clearing that up you guys and gals.

50 years justread? Wow, I never realized that!

posted by shamrock44 on Jan 15, 2014 at 11:21:31 pm     #  

There was a post on The Blade FB page asking for people affected by the flu to contact their reporter. I assume that's how they found the person.

posted by Anniecski on Jan 16, 2014 at 10:01:48 am     #