Toledo Talk

Fair is fair: point goes to Burris

Great article from a guy that I have criticized, rightfully so. Today, I say thanks for this piece. It affirms the perception that I have developed about Mr. Durant.
Perhaps a monogram doesn't indicate insanity, rather, pride.

http://www.toledoblade.com/Keith-Burris/2014/01/26/Heroic-leader-of-TPS-on-an-urgent-mission.html

Good luck to Mr. Durant. If I come across an opportunity to support him, I will. Perhaps TPS has a chance.

created by justread on Jan 26, 2014 at 01:06:38 pm     Education     Comments: 15

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Comments ... #

An East Side kid does well. My son went to Waite with him. Both are successful. Both come from 2 parent homes. You have to wonder what makes a kid succeed.

posted by SherryET on Jan 26, 2014 at 03:04:03 pm     #   1 person liked this

Burris could be the greatest guy in the world, but he's fighting a losing battle. That's difficult to say/read, but it's reality.

How does one man, a community group, well-meaning teachers, etc. straighten out the root of the problem? We are now entering into the second, third, fourth generations of children of parents who don't value education. It takes a strong kid not to model himself/herself after their environment. Dad doesn't care about the family and impregnates other women, mom has a different "boyfriend" every month, no discipline, low expectations for what life has to offer, etc.

It's good that people like Burris is willing to put his energy into this, but don't expect significant results. TPS will continue to slide into Detroit-like oblivion. The only possible solution would be a voucher system--separate the good from the bad and at least give some of the kids a chance.

posted by Starr15 on Jan 26, 2014 at 04:07:53 pm     #  

There's already a voucher system in Ohio.

posted by Nolan_Rosenkrans on Jan 26, 2014 at 04:17:09 pm     #  

Starr15 posted at 03:07:53 PM on Jan 26, 2014:

Burris could be the greatest guy in the world, but he's fighting a losing battle. That's difficult to say/read, but it's reality.

How does one man, a community group, well-meaning teachers, etc. straighten out the root of the problem? We are now entering into the second, third, fourth generations of children of parents who don't value education. It takes a strong kid not to model himself/herself after their environment. Dad doesn't care about the family and impregnates other women, mom has a different "boyfriend" every month, no discipline, low expectations for what life has to offer, etc.

It's good that people like Burris is willing to put his energy into this, but don't expect significant results. TPS will continue to slide into Detroit-like oblivion. The only possible solution would be a voucher system--separate the good from the bad and at least give some of the kids a chance.

Burris is an ass.

You must mean Durant.

posted by justread on Jan 26, 2014 at 04:23:23 pm     #  

Dad doesn't care about the family

Probably doesn't know who the Superintendent is, either.

posted by justread on Jan 26, 2014 at 04:44:55 pm     #  

Love the idea of re-opening a vocational high school for TPS.

Not everyone is cut out for college. Let some of those kids choose to learn a trade or vocation and graduate with the ability to support themselves.

posted by mom2 on Jan 26, 2014 at 04:49:04 pm     #   7 people liked this

mom2 posted at 03:49:04 PM on Jan 26, 2014:

Love the idea of re-opening a vocational high school for TPS.

Not everyone is cut out for college. Let some of those kids choose to learn a trade or vocation and graduate with the ability to support themselves.

One of the worst mistakes many public school systems ever did was closing vocational schools, rather than updating the curriculum for trades currently in demand.

Instead those kids were thrown out of the system in essence because "every kid needs to go to college." Was bullshit then, is bullshit now, but anyone who voiced a different opinion then (and now to a certain extent) is labeled either "anti-education" or "giving up on kids" because they acknowledge the reality that not every kid needs to go to college.

A plumber or auto mechanic doesn't need a college degree...but I'm paying for his kid's degree (I think) every time I have to call one out! There's good money to be had out there by hard-working folks--and you don't need 5-to-6-figure student loan debt to get it.

A lot of community colleges have picked up the slack of disappearing vocational high schools, but still it would be nice if a 15 year old who doesn't give two shits about medieval history--but is good with cars--can learn to support himself.

posted by oldhometown on Jan 26, 2014 at 06:08:50 pm     #   2 people liked this

Yes--I did mean Durant.

posted by Starr15 on Jan 26, 2014 at 06:58:44 pm     #  

There is a reason the Toledo School for the Arts is so successful. They are basically a vocational school for the arts.

I wish Durant the best of luck. I've heard nothing but positive things about this man. Toledo deserves and needs more leaders like him.

posted by upso on Jan 26, 2014 at 07:13:49 pm     #   1 person liked this

The Ohio "voucher system" is one of the most misunderstood and ridiculous policies in the State.

First, a student has to qualify for a voucher. You have to be in a failing school district (unless you're in the Cleveland Municipal School District--and then you're not eligible for a voucher).

Second, a student has to meet the family income requirements.

Next, a student has to find a private school that will accept the voucher (and the number of vouchers offered per year are limited).

This was all set-up by the teachers' unions and designed to discourage people from taking advantage of the vouchers. What a shame that the students' needs aren't the priority.

posted by Starr15 on Jan 26, 2014 at 07:35:24 pm     #  

Nolan, does each high school still offer a few skill center/vocational courses? If so, then there isn't any need for a stand-alone vocational high school. Toledo already had Macomber/Whitney serving as a stand-alone vocational school, and it closed in 1991 or 1992.

It may have already been publicly announced, but I've heard there are plans for the Cherry Street Mission to move into the Macomber Building, but I don't have any idea when.

posted by 6th_Floor on Jan 26, 2014 at 08:06:35 pm     #  

6th_Floor posted at 07:06:35 PM on Jan 26, 2014:

Nolan, does each high school still offer a few skill center/vocational courses? If so, then there isn't any need for a stand-alone vocational high school. Toledo already had Macomber/Whitney serving as a stand-alone vocational school, and it closed in 1991 or 1992.

It may have already been publicly announced, but I've heard there are plans for the Cherry Street Mission to move into the Macomber Building, but I don't have any idea when.

The Cherry Street move was announced. Hasn't been TPS property for a while.

High schools have vo tech programs, both in skill centers and a couple scattered sites, such as the airport. The idea is to recentralize them. Haven't gotten into the pluses and minuses of the idea yet but plan to.

posted by Nolan_Rosenkrans on Jan 26, 2014 at 09:13:30 pm     #  

Doesn't Toledo Technology Academy count as vo/tech? Why not centralize everything there, in the former DeVilbiss High?

Nolan, please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe Toledo Technology Academy is a TPS school.

posted by Anniecski on Jan 27, 2014 at 12:29:12 pm     #  

http://tps.org

A couple of the TPS schools:

Other TPS programs:

  • Learning Centers - TPS offers program(s) for adults. I think these programs are geared toward the students.
    • Small Animal Management
    • Natural Resources
    • Turfgrass and Landscape
    • Floriculture
TPS has a variety of career technology offerings taught in each of our six high schools. Students can select training in one of fourteen career technology pathways. If the particular area of training is not offered in their home school, students can elect to transfer to the school offering the training, or spend part of their day in their home school and the other part at the location offering the career technology pathway they want to pursue.

These areas of training can lead to employment in the senior year through co-op agreements with local businesses, early placement training with an employer during the senior year or internships with an area professional.

Of course, Toledo has two public school districts.

posted by jr on Jan 27, 2014 at 01:28:57 pm     #  

Anniecski posted at 11:29:12 AM on Jan 27, 2014:

Doesn't Toledo Technology Academy count as vo/tech? Why not centralize everything there, in the former DeVilbiss High?

Nolan, please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe Toledo Technology Academy is a TPS school.

As jr pointed out, TTA is a TPS magnet school.

TTA isn't a true vo/tech school. While they don't push kids into colleges, there's still the idea that kids will graduate and likely get advanced degrees, not necessarily go straight into a trade or profession. There's less specification; it's a tech focused high school, not a vo/tech.

They also recently announced they'll be adding junior high grades to the school, filling up DeVilbiss a little more.

posted by Nolan_Rosenkrans on Jan 27, 2014 at 01:51:47 pm     #