Toledo Talk

Why are tax dollars needed to support this?

13abc: Toledo considers using tax dollars for wall art

Lindsay Webb is the proponent. How absolutely shocking </end sarcasm>.

created by oldhometown on Apr 21, 2014 at 07:15:37 pm     Local-Politics     Comments: 50

source      versions


Comments ... #

My favorite line-"Bonnie McHugh says, “There’s a lot of taxpayer’s monies going out in a lot of different areas why not something to make our city look nice?” So in other words since we already waste money on other things why not waste some more. Here are shots of the murals on South Broadway which I took last week. http://www.wspd.com/photos/main/murals-on-broadway-386570/#/0/22402945 How many of these murals have spurred economic development in that area? How many are on empty buildings?

posted by fred on Apr 21, 2014 at 07:39:32 pm     #   2 people liked this

I'd like to see a list of all the different programs and services council gives money to before I pass judgement. Personally, I'd love to see a boat load more murals in the city but I appreciate they don't come without a price tag. I also appreciate while I don't mind funding them, others might not.

I will say, I drove through south toledo at dusk a couple of nights ago and noted all of the murals you mention Fred. While I'm not looking to open a business anytime soon, they sure do add a lot of friendliness to the neighborhood. Not sure friendliness is worth the sticker price, but I'm happy to see them up and don't mind my tax dollars going towards them.

I'm curious what the sticker price is for the average household for supporting things like this? Are we talking hundreds of dollars in taxpayer money per house? Or are we talking pennies and dimes?

I really have no idea how these things work. I would love to see the data.

posted by upso on Apr 21, 2014 at 08:28:47 pm     #   4 people liked this

Also... food for thought: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_windows_theory

Fred, do you have an opinion on the Broken Windows Theory? Do you think communities should invest in things that detour blight etc?

Living in the inner city, I see firsthand how a fresh coat of paint goes a long way. Curious to see what others think about that.

Also, do we know how many murals the 15k is going to bring the area?

posted by upso on Apr 21, 2014 at 08:35:22 pm     #   4 people liked this

I'm curious what the sticker price is for the average household for supporting things like this? Are we talking hundreds of dollars in taxpayer money per house? Or are we talking pennies and dimes?

Individually, any program can be justified as a 'good' use of taxpayer funds, but eventually if you keep adding program after program after program, the total tax burden becomes excessive or the capital needs of the community are pushed aside to fund such social programs.

I do think property owners should do things to invest in their property and deter blight. But I don't think the government should do anything to private property.

posted by MsArcher on Apr 21, 2014 at 10:47:47 pm     #   4 people liked this

I have a feeling that if this does happen that they will just get ruined with graffiti artists spraying over them. Just my thoughts.

posted by stooks on Apr 22, 2014 at 07:46:41 am     #  

stooks posted at 07:46:41 AM on Apr 22, 2014:

I have a feeling that if this does happen that they will just get ruined with graffiti artists spraying over them. Just my thoughts.

Sadly, you are likely correct. A good example: there is some kind of new building - pumping station?? - on the AW Trail exit to downtown. The building wasn't even complete before the idiot graffiti artists felt the need to "tag" it.

posted by Foodie on Apr 22, 2014 at 08:27:07 am     #   2 people liked this

actually... typically... graffiti artists stay away from community murals. At least in Toledo. Those murals in south toledo have been up for a while and have suffered from zero vandalism.

posted by upso on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:08:26 am     #   2 people liked this

Please, PLEASE people....stop voting for idiots like Webb.

posted by JeepMaker on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:27:38 am     #   2 people liked this

I dont have a problem with tax dollars being spent (wisely) on quality of life items, especially low dollar items.

posted by BulldogBuckeye on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:31:45 am     #  

Neighborhood beautification has a fast ROI in comparison to almost any government spending you can look at.

Upso posted a link to the Broken Windows Theory - take some time to read it (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_windows_theory) and you might be surprised. There's mounting evidence that it's one of the cheapest ways to deter crime and spur development in any neighborhood.

I'm not someone who likes my tax dollars wasted or thrown down the toilet, but this is a program that actually makes a measurable and significant difference for a very low sum of money. Hard to argue against it in my mind.

posted by endcycle on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:54:48 am     #  

Let's see some local proof that these murals work. I don't see meaurable improvement along Broadway where the current crop of murals is, and I drive it almost everyday.

posted by fred on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:59:10 am     #   3 people liked this

Did the installation of those mushroom/penis/sombrero fountains at the Broadway roundabout cause any spur in development or decrease in crime in that neighborhood?

posted by dell_diva on Apr 22, 2014 at 10:18:29 am     #  

"Upso posted a link to the Broken Windows Theory - take some time to read it"

I did. It suggests that "maintaining" a neighborhood in an "orderly fashion" has been shown to deter vandalism.
The article didn't appear to make the leap between graffiti-style mural art and "orderly maintenance."

One could probably find evidence that would suggest that graffiti style art on structures and building promotes lesser works of graffiti as well.

If a property owner would like to try this experiment at their own cost, they should.

I'll take a few more pothole patches, thank you. They are like "broken windows" too.

posted by justread on Apr 22, 2014 at 10:19:15 am     #   2 people liked this

dell_diva posted at 10:18:29 AM on Apr 22, 2014:

Did the installation of those mushroom/penis/sombrero fountains at the Broadway roundabout cause any spur in development or decrease in crime in that neighborhood?

They look much better than the works of the Overpass Picasso at the other end of Broadway, which look like the outskirts of Tijuana.

posted by justread on Apr 22, 2014 at 10:22:58 am     #  

From 13abc: Toledo mayor D. Michael Collins [Dennis Michael Collins] agrees. He says the Toledo Art Commission will get $323,877 this year from the city. He believes the mural money should come from that fund.

So the city government is throwing over $300 grand at a non-profit and at the same time is bitching about having a bad case of the shorts. Why am I not surprised.

Mayor Dennis continues: The mayor says, “We can’t have two independent art programs going on in the City of Toledo.”

Why not? One's as good (or bad) as the other, and neither one is getting the pot holes filled in.

Even though I don't agree with him I have a certain amount of sympathy for Mayor Dennis. He's been handed a bad situation which will remain on Hizzoner's desk until the next election, and he has to work with Toledo City Council, any three of whom have the combined I.Q. of an average ball-peen hammer.

I don't know who he's trying to appease with this mural business, but if it would get the city council to make three intelligent moves I'd say it was money well spent. That's kind of a big 'if' though.

posted by madjack on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:21:50 am     #  

The city also spent thousands of dollars on customized streetlights and irrigated flower gardens in the median on Reynolds Road between Heatherdowns and Airport Highway to help spur development around the former Southwyck Mall. That area now has more deserted buildings and empty storefronts for lease than it ever did. And yes, one new business agreed to go in to an empty building there but not until the city promised to spend $800k more to demolish a former hotel.

posted by Mike21 on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:25:10 am     #   2 people liked this

JeepMaker posted at 09:27:38 AM on Apr 22, 2014:

Please, PLEASE people....stop voting for idiots like Webb.

They won't. That moron will continue to be re-elected as long as she runs.

posted by Foodie on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:31:13 am     #   1 person liked this

Let's see: $325k for the Arts commission, $800k to demolish a building so that another business "might" move in nearby.

I wonder how much road repair we could have gotten for $1.125 million?

You want to attract new business Mr. Mayor? Fixing the GD roads would likely go a long way towards that goal. Imagine decision makers from states with decent roads coming here for a tour and having their fillings jarred out of their teeth from the potholes.

Think the murals will make them forget that ride?

Think again.

Oh, and I forgot the $300k+ to open the pools for a handful of people to use. And, I'm sure there's plenty more pork being handed out that I don't even want to think about.

posted by Foodie on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:37:43 am     #   1 person liked this

Also from the 13abc story, :

Rachel Richardson is the founder of Art Corner of Toledo. Her group would get the $15,000 from the city and a matching $15,000 from Lucas County to fund this art work.


Related:


From the toledowiki.net page:

Art Corner Toledo (ACT) is an agency founded in March of 2010 to promote Toledo as a city populated by artists and activists. ACT creates partnerships between artists and activists to create works of public art to depict local activism and general world changing.


Mission statement from the ACT's Facebook page:

Art Corner Toledo (ACT)'s vision is to create points of progress and growth from sites of public art in blighted or underdeveloped neighborhoods and to engage the community surrounding each mural in its creation by encouraging volunteerism and resource sharing.


Toledo Loves Love Mural - TimeLapse Progress Video - Art Corner Toledo (follow link to view large version of the video)


Excerpts from the Toledo.com interview with Rachel Richardson:

What advantages does being in Northwest Ohio/Toledo offer your efforts?

I have to use a quote to illustrate my idea here:

“Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back, always ineffectiveness, concerning all acts of initiative (and creation). There is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. Begin it now.”
~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

I've had this on my fridge since my very first apartment when I was 21.


In other words, “Toledo provides.”

posted by jr on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:56:04 am     #  

So the new mayor is turning out like past mayors?

posted by MIJeff on Apr 22, 2014 at 12:03:15 pm     #   1 person liked this

So we have the AW trail full of potholes, but we have the time and money to waste on this??? I see the new administration knows how to prioritize.

posted by classylady on Apr 22, 2014 at 04:52:41 pm     #   1 person liked this

So we have the AW trail full of potholes, but we have the time and money to waste on this??? I see the new administration knows how to prioritize.

! posted by classylady on Apr 22, 2014 at 04:52:41 pm # +

Is it one or the other?

posted by ahmahler on Apr 22, 2014 at 04:59:39 pm     #  

How preposterous! You can build 1.5 showers in One Government Center with that money!

posted by clt212 on Apr 22, 2014 at 05:16:06 pm     #   3 people liked this

ahmahler posted at 04:59:39 PM on Apr 22, 2014:
So we have the AW trail full of potholes, but we have the time and money to waste on this??? I see the new administration knows how to prioritize.

! posted by classylady on Apr 22, 2014 at 04:52:41 pm # +

Is it one or the other?

"One or the other" describes an alternative.
She seemed to be speaking of prioritization.

Art is cool. It's just that the roads really are screwed up, bro. Think of the bicyclists. Those of us who were not smart enough to take steps to live, work, worship, shop, and vacation downtown need some potholes filled and roads fixed.
For reals. And fast. Moog is running out of ball joints.

Some would consider drivable roads an infrastructure priority.

Art is cool too. Although I personally wouldn't want urban murals in my suburban landscape for any price. It's cool to tax me to pay for art for someone else's neighborhood though. Especially if they are going to be enjoyed by: homeless people, vegans, freegans. people who choose to live in the ghetto because it is so damn hip and the totally awesome brave new downtown frontierspersons and the hardware store that they need.

We have a top ten museum here, and a thriving art community, but if we miss this one chance.... we'll NEVER get a SXSW festival.

And that would not be hip.

You know what would be hip? A super-cool young hipster reaches into the pocket and whips out $15,000 and pays for it. This is the opportunity for a young successful Toledo supporter to get on the map. Although I do understand that they wear very tight jeans, which could be the problem.

posted by justread on Apr 22, 2014 at 06:50:02 pm     #   8 people liked this

we'll NEVER get a SXSW festival.

Umm, that's because the name of the festival refers to Austin, Texas where the South meets the Southwest.

Priorities are fine, but do you have a difficult time paying 2 bills on the same day? And, last I checked (today) there was a ton of road construction going on all over town.

Justread-something has changed-it's either a) you've gotten much stranger and now transition during all comments from sarcasm to serious and back again without warning or reason, or b) I just realized you do that.

posted by ahmahler on Apr 22, 2014 at 08:02:05 pm     #   2 people liked this

Just an FYI... in regards to the $323,877

One percent of Toledo's Capital Improvement Budget gets put aside for the purchase, conservation, and public education of art.

more info about the program can be found here: http://www.theartscommission.org/module-positions/about-art-in-public-places-app

posted by upso on Apr 22, 2014 at 08:10:55 pm     #   1 person liked this

"a) you've gotten much stranger and now transition during all comments from sarcasm to serious and back again without warning or reason, or b) I just realized you do that."

Is it one or the other?

I knew we'd never get a SXSW festival.
Those bastards and their geographical maps.

Howzabout MXMW?

posted by justread on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:05:17 pm     #   2 people liked this

upso posted at 08:10:55 PM on Apr 22, 2014:

Just an FYI... in regards to the $323,877

One percent of Toledo's Capital Improvement Budget gets put aside for the purchase, conservation, and public education of art.

more info about the program can be found here: http://www.theartscommission.org/module-positions/about-art-in-public-places-app

1% is 1% too much. Fix the streets first. Hire more cops, hire more firemen. Do what you are required to do.

posted by Erin on Apr 22, 2014 at 09:26:13 pm     #   2 people liked this

upso posted at 08:10:55 PM on Apr 22, 2014:

Just an FYI... in regards to the $323,877

One percent of Toledo's Capital Improvement Budget gets put aside for the purchase, conservation, and public education of art.

more info about the program can be found here: http://www.theartscommission.org/module-positions/about-art-in-public-places-app

Is this in the City Charter? If not, then the city has no business doing it.

I love art more than the average Joe or Jane but these kind of expenditures are nice if and when the city is flush with cash - which it is not nor has it been for quite some time.

Stop stealing from the Capital Improvements Fund to pay for folly. Fix the infrastructure, hire the necessary cops and firefighters. Doing these few things will go a long way in attracting new business and/or residents. At the very least, it should help stem the flow currently running from the city.

posted by Foodie on Apr 22, 2014 at 10:45:48 pm     #  

Yeah... it actually is. It's been going on since 1977

posted by upso on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:24:35 pm     #   2 people liked this

I would suggest that it's not "stealing" as it's an official thing. Clearly 30+ years ago, and to this date, the higher ups felt and feel that public art is part of Capital Improvements.

posted by upso on Apr 22, 2014 at 11:27:21 pm     #   2 people liked this

"Stop stealing from the Capital Improvements Fund to pay for folly. Fix the infrastructure, hire the necessary cops and firefighters."

But Toledo city government transfers money from the "capital-improvements budget to balance general-fund operations like police and fire."

Apparently, funding police and fire means less money for roads.

By the way, it's not "stealing" from the Capital Improvements Plan (CIP). It's called "reallocation," which is permitted because Toledo voters approved Issue 5 in May 2010.

Passage of Issue 5 allowed Toledo government to take money from the CIP and use it for the general fund.

Prior to the May 2010 election:

Sarantou urges vote in favor of Issue 5

Toledo Councilman George Sarantou urged voters yesterday to vote in favor of Issue 5, which will allow the city to reallocate its 0.75 percent income tax.

The current allocation is split equally among the general fund, police and fire operations, and to the capital improvements budget.

"Passage of Issue 5 will allow the city of Toledo to use the dollars from capital improvement to be used to support Toledo general fund," Mr. Sarantou said outside the city's Hoffman Road landfill. "Approximately $7 million could be reallocated to the general fund, largely to support public safety operations."

Mayor Bell urges Toledoans to support Issue 5

Mayor Michael P. Bell and various members of Toledo City Council today joined together to urge Toledo voters to support Issue 5 on the May 4 ballot.

Issue 5 is not a tax. The ballot initiative will permit the Mayor and Council to redirect existing funds mandated for the capital improvements fund into the general fund while maintaining a capital program.

Approximately 32,000 votes were cast on May 4, 2010, regarding Issue 5. Fewer than 18,000 Toledoans gave city government permission to reallocate from the CIP.

Back in the spring of 2010, Sarantou said about raiding reallocating the CIP:

"Approximately $7 million could be reallocated to the general fund, largely to support public safety operations."

Mar 31, 2014 - Toledo Blade - Toledo City Council passes budget with 11-1 vote in special meeting

For several years, the city has taken millions each year out of the capital-improvements budget to keep the general fund in the black. This year, the Collins administration proposed using $14.1 million from that [CIP] fund — which pays for street repairs and other capital improvements.


"Is this in the City Charter?"

  1. http://toledo.oh.gov
  2. search results for 'city charter'
  3. click link for CITY OF TOLEDO CHARTER
  4. expand "CHAPTER 167 Arts Commission"
  5. click "Art in Public Places Program."
  6. scroll down and you'll see: One percent for arts; sources and uses of funds; method of calculation.

Here's the related section from the city charter:

167.06. Art in Public Places Program.

(a) Purpose.

The City hereby declares its commitment to assume a leadership position in establishing a favorable and supportive climate for cultural arts in the community. Through its Art in Public Places Program, the City seeks to create a stimulating and humanizing public environment by the inclusion and integration of high quality artworks in its public buildings and public spaces. The City further seeks to encourage public education to enhance the community's understanding and enjoyment of the artworks and the artistic process from which they derive. This policy therefore is established to direct the inclusion of works of art and/or design services of artists in public places in the City.

(b) Definitions.

(1) "Art in Public Places Committee" means a standing committee appointed by the Arts Commission as provided for in procedures outlined in the Public Art Master Plan to oversee quality control of the Art in Public Places Program and its projects, and to recommend the prioritized projects, specific fund allocations and design approaches itemized in the Municipal Art Plan. One member of the Art in Public Places Committee shall be appointed by the City Plan Commission.

(2) "Art in Public Places Program" means the program coordinated by the Arts Commission which places visual art on City owned properties and facilities.

(3) "Arts Commission" means the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo.

(4) "Artwork" means any creative work created by artists, such as, but not limited to sculpture, murals and paintings. "Artwork" does not include creative work designed solely by architects or landscape architects or engineers. However, "artwork" may include creative work designed in collaboration with architects, landscape architects and engineers when initiated by the Art in Public Places Program. "Artwork" may be freestanding, may be integral to the architecture or landscape, or may be incorporated into the construction project.

(5) "CIP Budget" or "Capital Improvements Program Budget" means the plan for capital improvements for the City approved annually by Council.

(6) "Design Review Boards" means committees of community residents, City representatives and arts professionals who shall select artworks for specific sites that have been itemized in the Municipal Art Plan. Procedures for appointments to these Boards and Board responsibilities shall be established and described in the Public Art Master Plan.

(7) "Eligible Capital Construction Project" means any capital improvement project:

A. That is funded wholly or in part by other than City income tax revenues,

B. To constructor remodel a building, facility or park, or any portion thereof, which, as a significant feature of its end use includes access to or use by members of the general public, but only if,

C. The entity allocating funds for the project, or the law governing the use of such funds, permits the use of those funds for the purpose of acquiring artwork as a feature of the project.

(8) "Municipal Art Plan" means a prioritized list of art projects, developed annually by the Art in Public Places Committee, with budgets and recommended design approaches, approved by the Arts Commission and subsequently by the City Plan Commission.

(9) "City Plan Commission" means the Toledo City Plan Commission as established by Sections 189, 190, 191 and 192 of the Toledo City Charter.

(10) "Public Art Collection" means all artworks which are acquired by the City through the Art in Public Places Program or otherwise.

(11) "Public Art Master Plan" means a document which shall be prepared by the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo upon recommendation of the Art in Public Places Committee and subject to the approval of the Plan Commission. The Arts Commission shall annually review the Public Art Master Plan and revise and update the document as necessary, subject to approval by the Plan Commission. The Public Art Master Plan shall include internal standard operating procedures for the administration of the Art in Public Places Program and a comprehensive site inventory of existing and potential artwork locations.

( c ) One percent for arts; sources and uses of funds; method of calculation.

(1) The annual Capital Improvements Program Budget submitted to Council for approval shall include a line item in an amount equal to one percent (1%) of the total income tax-funded CIP budget, excluding from such total the amount dedicated to pay debt service to be used for design services of artists and for the selection, acquisition, commissioning, creation and installation of artwork, and for restoration of existing artwork in the Public Art Collection as needed, and for administration of the projects itemized in the Municipal Art Plan. The use of funds derived from this source shall not be restricted to any project-specific location and may be pooled, aggregated, allocated and used for artwork at any location with a high degree of public use or accessibility. These funds shall be transferred to and maintained in an appropriate account or accounts within the Department of Natural Resources.

(2) Appropriations for Eligible Capital Construction Projects shall allocate one percent (1%) of the total appropriation for design services of artists and for the selection, acquisition, commissioning, creation and installation of artworks, and for administration of the acquisition of artworks for those projects. If required by the entity allocating such funds or the law governing the use of such funds, placement of the artwork shall be restricted to the sites of the subject construction or remodeling projects. These artwork funds shall be maintained within the account codes of the City department responsible for the construction or remodeling project.

(3) In applications to outside granting authorities for Eligible Capital Construction Projects, the responsible officials within City departments shall include a request for funds for artists' services and/or artworks as specified herein.

(d) Allocation of funds.

(1) After passage of the annual CIP budget by Council, the Arts Commission shall review and approve a Municipal Art Plan, which designates specific project sites, funding allocations and recommended design approaches for all artwork projects to proceed during the year, as well as amounts to be allocated for restoration of specific existing works and administration of projects. The Arts Commission shall submit the Municipal Art Plan to the City Plan Commission for approval.

(2) Following the approval of the Municipal Art Plan by the City Plan Commission, the Arts Commission shall prepare and submit to Council a proposed annual ordinance, and such other ordinances as are necessary from time to time, authorizing and directing the appropriation and expenditure of the one percent (1%) moneys described in subsection ©(1) hereof in accordance with the approved Municipal Art Plan.

(3) Artwork projects approved in the Municipal Art Plan pursuant to subsection ©(2) hereof shall be included in the authorizing legislation initiated by the affected City department to appropriate and transfer funds for approved CIP projects into departmental accounts and to let contracts and agreements. The Arts Commission shall oversee and manage these artwork projects. Artwork funds shall be maintained within the account codes of the City department responsible for the construction or remodeling project, or within other appropriate City account codes that may be designated and established from time to time.

(e) Responsibilities.

(1) Arts Commission representatives shall meet with the Mayor or his designee on an annual basis to ascertain the capital construction and remodeling projects planned for the current year and the project budgets therefor and the status of any capital projects planned for the next four years.

(2) The Mayor or his designee shall inform the Arts Commission of proposed and planned Eligible Capital Construction Projects at the earliest possible point, in order to allow for adequate review of the projects' potential for incorporation and planning of appropriate artwork. Integration of the artists' design concepts and/or the artwork into the project architecture should be ensured, insofar as feasible, by concurrent selection of the artist(s) and the architect or designer.

(3) The Arts Commission shall be responsible for the administration of the Art in Public Places Program, including development of the Public Art Master Plan, approving an annual Municipal Art Plan, negotiating contracts with artists, managing those contracts through completion and installation of the artworks, appointing the Art in Public Places Committee, establishing program policies and guidelines, approving selection of artwork, coordination of artwork creation and installation, coordination of public information and dedication related to projects, coordination and oversight of the Art in Public Places Committee and all Design Review Boards, validating payment requests that are submitted to the City, coordinating artist selection procedures, producing published information related to competitions associated with those projects, maintaining appropriate records and correspondence related to all projects, committees and Design Review Boards, responsibility for curatorial services related to the Public Art Collection, and shall have the responsibilities concerning deaccessioning and deposition of surplus artwork that are set forth in Chapter 187 and other administrative responsibilities associated with and necessary to the aforementioned duties.

(4) The Arts Commission, upon recommendation of the Art in Public Places Committee, shall be responsible for approval of all proposals for restoration of artwork in the Public Art Collection. Subject to appropriate funding, from time to time the Arts Commission shall arrange for a survey by an arts professional to determine the condition of the Public Art Collection. The survey shall include a condition report on each artwork and recommendations for the restoration of each artwork. Professional restoration methods shall be required to maintain the integrity of the artwork. Such methods shall comply with any contractual obligations which may have been entered into in the acquisition of those artworks. To the extent practicable, prior to any major restoration, the artist shall be contacted, and, if appropriate, asked to perform such restoration.

(5) The Arts Commission shall be responsible for public education programs and activities associated with the Art in Public Places Program in order to increase public appreciation of the Public Art Collection. These activities may include, but are not limited to, programs initiated by the Arts Commission, programs cosponsored with other community agencies and groups, and activities which support existing programs in the schools and in the community.

(6) The Arts Commission, as an advisory body to the City Plan Commission, and upon the recommendation of the Art in Public Places Committee, shall review and recommend for acceptance or rejection, according to criteria described in the Public Art Master Plan, any artwork proposed to be donated to the City. The Arts Commission shall establish such policies and guidelines as may be appropriate to facilitate and encourage the donation of high quality artwork to the City.

(Ord. 612-92. Passed 9-1-92.)

posted by jr on Apr 23, 2014 at 01:08:40 am     #   6 people liked this

It may have made it into the charter 30+ years ago but does the city still have the income of 30+ years ago?

posted by MIJeff on Apr 23, 2014 at 02:45:17 am     #  

It may have made it into the charter 30+ years ago but does the city still have the income of 30+ years ago?

! posted by MIJeff on Apr 23, 2014 at 02:45:17 am # +

I believe that's why it's a percentage and not a fixed amount-because income is always fluctuating, No state or local government is flush with funds. You name the city, no matter how well off you view them to be, and we can discuss how their funding for infrastructure, services, etc, is not what they need. This is a divisive choice, for any government, to reinvest in it's beautification through art. However, the choice was made 30 years ago. The argument at this point, since JR pointed out so thoroughly about this being in the charter, should be more along the lines of: Is that fund (inevitable 1%) being used well? Personally, I find $15k for murals to be a bargain. I mean, it costs 10% of that just to get my house painted 1 color.

posted by ahmahler on Apr 23, 2014 at 07:43:38 am     #  

Having learned what a transformative influence that public graffiti-style art has on the quality of life and standard of living of a community, I could never paint my house one color again.

How could I do that to my neighbors, knowing what I know?

A mural is the clear choice for the future of my neighborhood.

The more you know. :)

posted by justread on Apr 23, 2014 at 07:51:26 am     #  

posted by wahhutch9 on Apr 23, 2014 at 08:25:40 am     #  

upso posted at 08:10:55 PM on Apr 22, 2014:

Just an FYI... in regards to the $323,877

One percent of Toledo's Capital Improvement Budget gets put aside for the purchase, conservation, and public education of art.

more info about the program can be found here: http://www.theartscommission.org/module-positions/about-art-in-public-places-app

My apologies in advance if I am wrong on this, but didn't the 1% for the Arts get started when Papa Block died and the City of Toledo got a huge estate tax windfall from his estate and the Blade put MAJOR pressure on the city on how to spend said estate tax windfall? I'm looking for backup on that, but its was 40 years ago. Maybe someone else remembers.

posted by MsArcher on Apr 23, 2014 at 09:06:51 am     #  

justread posted at 07:51:26 AM on Apr 23, 2014:

Having learned what a transformative influence that public graffiti-style art has on the quality of life and standard of living of a community, I could never paint my house one color again.

How could I do that to my neighbors, knowing what I know?

A mural is the clear choice for the future of my neighborhood.

The more you know. :)

interestingly, I agree with you (even though I know you're being sarcastic). I would love to put a mural on my house every few years by a local artist. I wonder if that's allowed in Maumee, now that I think about it.

Side note - when we went to Costa Rica for our honeymoon, we wound up chatting with some locals for a while about house painting. When you live in such a continually wet environment with winds and changes in temp, paint doesn't last long. It's a thing in CR to have to change your house color up completely every few years due to that, so people go way outlandish. You could tell the better neighborhoods by just how bright the colors were all over the place. Love that, personally. In the USA, you can't do that without your neighbors freaking out.

posted by endcycle on Apr 23, 2014 at 09:13:51 am     #  

Yes, I am painfully aware that the voters approved "re-allocating" $$ from the Capital Improvements Fund. One of the dumber things voters approved.

My point is this: if the city is in the financial position where it finds it necessary to "borrow" (read: it will never be paid back) from the Capital Improvements Fund to help fund police and fire, why on Earth are we using those funds for other non-essential things when our infrastructure is in such disrepair? Just because we can? It makes no fiscal sense whatsoever.

It is akin to taking out a home equity loan to pay for emergency repairs on your home but instead using the $$ for a Hawaii vacation.

posted by Foodie on Apr 23, 2014 at 09:30:32 am     #   1 person liked this

Clearly you hate Hawaiians.

posted by justread on Apr 23, 2014 at 09:32:05 am     #  

justread posted at 09:32:05 AM on Apr 23, 2014:

Clearly you hate Hawaiians.

Clearly.

posted by Foodie on Apr 23, 2014 at 12:01:51 pm     #  

"(2) "Art in Public Places Program" means the program coordinated by the Arts Commission which places visual art on City owned properties and facilities."

So then the city owns the place where they want to put the murals?

posted by SherryET on Apr 23, 2014 at 02:35:28 pm     #  

No the Mural money (the 15k) is not part of this program. It's an additional ask but a separate group.

Art in Public Places is run by the Arts Commission of Great Toledo.

The mural ask is being made by Art Corner Toledo.

Two different groups with very similar names.

posted by upso on Apr 23, 2014 at 02:48:08 pm     #  

To be fair, english is hard. :(

posted by endcycle on Apr 23, 2014 at 05:23:07 pm     #  

I admit I didn't read the whole city charter but that part caught my eye.

posted by SherryET on Apr 23, 2014 at 06:11:53 pm     #  

NOW can we have nice things, like art?

http://www.13abc.com/story/25336721/pothole-progress-in-toledo

posted by ahmahler on Apr 25, 2014 at 11:11:52 am     #  

We've had art for a long time. You must be speaking specifically of a particular unfunded mural graffiti project. Be like Edward Libbe. Write a check.

posted by justread on Apr 25, 2014 at 11:32:11 am     #   2 people liked this

Installed by world famous artist Pierre Clerk (his birthday is tomorrow, he'll be 86) in 1983, "City Candy" has certainly saved us from how bad it would have been if not for civic art. 31 years of protection from decline, elephant attacks, tornadoes, and bad behavior.

http://www.toledoblade.com/Art/2008/07/09/Touching-up-City-Candy-Painter-Jim-Heldt-restores-the-good-looks-of-Toledo-outdoor-sculptures.html

It cost over $56,000 to repaint three of the civic sculptures in downtown in 2008. They require a repaint each decade. Better start saving for 2018.

posted by justread on Apr 25, 2014 at 03:41:33 pm     #  

5,600/year for 3 really cool pieces of art in my downtown area? i'm okay with that. Seems a bargain to me.

posted by endcycle on Apr 25, 2014 at 04:53:49 pm     #   1 person liked this

Perfect.
It's good to pay the current and future incremental expenses of past additions to the budget that result from tax funding of the arts.
And then we can buy more.
After we do our chores.

Love, Dad.

posted by justread on Apr 25, 2014 at 06:36:54 pm     #