Toledo Talk

Bath redesign

Our house still has its original 'pepto abysmal' pink tile in the bath, and its way past time to gut it and have it redone.

I've put it off for a while most!y for financial reasons, but also since its our only bath. Anyone have any experience in how long these things take? I'm asking because we would need to relocate for the duration and I'm curious as to how long we'd need to be vagabonds...

created by billy on Jun 09, 2014 at 07:28:23 pm     Comments: 15

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2-3 weeks for a complete gut to studs. Should be able to to have a working toilet all but a few nights. Same with a shower.

posted by slowsol on Jun 09, 2014 at 07:36:10 pm     #  

Yeah, we can rough it as much as possible... Might also consider having the work done in the "off" camping season and seeing if one of our friends would loan us a camper since they wouldn't be using it...

posted by billy on Jun 09, 2014 at 07:55:01 pm     #  

Driveway camping!! :)

I went through this a couple of years ago and was able to time things so that I was without a toilet for about a day while the new floor tile dried. I stayed at a hotel one night. The next night the toilet was in. That was about a small of a window that I can imagine. We used heaters to speed it up (it was cold out). Two full days without is probably a more realistic minimum, assuming you are doing a new floor.

posted by justread on Jun 09, 2014 at 08:06:28 pm     #  

Make sure you get a reputable contractor, don't pay everything up front (1/3 to 1/2 should be plenty), have a contract with a total amount and completion date and financial penalties if the work isn't done on time (along with an option for you to hire a different contractor to finish the job if it isn't done on time and deduct it from the original contractor's price) and don't make the final payment till the job is done. This will save you a lot of headaches, stress, inconveniences and possibly money.

posted by Mike21 on Jun 09, 2014 at 08:15:29 pm     #  

We didn't do a whole-bathroom remodel, but we had an old tub and surround taken out, a new tub and surround put in, some adaptive plumbing work done, an old toilet changed out for a new one, and new flooring installed, which included a partial rebuild of the subfloor due to water damage. Total time on the project was two days -- the guy worked his ass off! He was a machine!

We were only without a toilet for about a half-day, which was no bother since we have a half-bath as well. I think there was another 24 hours in which we could take a bath but not a shower, which was just a short-lived mild inconvenience. We then repainted the walls and ceiling ourselves.

Good luck!

posted by jmleong on Jun 10, 2014 at 01:36:10 am     #  

billy:

Is the tile and grout still in good shape? Our primary bath still has the "pepto abysmal" pink (actually, ours is a bit more salmon colored) tile also. However, for the 25 years we've lived there, we've never used the tub/shower so the tile and grout are in pristine shape. Apparently, previous owners didn't use it either.

While we've replaced the sink/vanity/toilet/flooring/plumbing/light fixtures, we left the tile and worked around it because it is in such great shape and we liked the retro look. The most challenging aspect was being able to select a vanity/sink/flooring and then a shade of paint that went with all of our selections and the existing tile. We also had a plasterer apply knockdown to the ceiling and walls. It all turned out quite well.

Just a thought..............

posted by Foodie on Jun 10, 2014 at 04:23:28 pm     #  

Lead...the bain of all remodels of housing stock pre/and 1978 vintage. Just a heads up, if this issue isn't brought up by the contractor you are considering, then proceed at your own risk. You may justify the risk by doing the work yourself. Good luck, I wish you well.

posted by MI_Builder on Jun 10, 2014 at 11:41:55 pm     #  

Another heads up: when choosing a new bathtub, if you care at all about the quality of the bathing experience, get a measurement from the drain at the bottom to the overflow drain under the faucet.

When we did a bath remodel, all of the new tubs were shallower than they were 30 years ago. With our winters, I didn't want to be sitting in a nice hot bath and have fully half my body shivering above the waterline.

If you want to sink down into the water, get some measurements and be prepared to special-order a decent tub. It's surprising; even the plumbers we consulted thought that 10 inches of water is perfectly acceptable for a bath.

posted by viola on Jun 11, 2014 at 12:59:50 pm     #  

"even the plumbers we consulted thought that 10 inches of water is perfectly acceptable for a bath.".... that water is cold....and deep too - <plumber's urinal joke>

posted by justareviewer on Jun 11, 2014 at 01:40:08 pm     #   1 person liked this

MI_Builder brought up a good point that I never thought of. According to the RRP law all contractors have to be licensed or hire someone that is licensed for lead abatement for anything Pre-1978. This can get quite expensive. This rule doesn't apply if you do it yourself though.

http://www2.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-painting-program

posted by lfrost2125 on Jun 11, 2014 at 01:40:29 pm     #  

viola posted at 12:59:50 PM on Jun 11, 2014:

Another heads up: when choosing a new bathtub, if you care at all about the quality of the bathing experience, get a measurement from the drain at the bottom to the overflow drain under the faucet.

When we did a bath remodel, all of the new tubs were shallower than they were 30 years ago. With our winters, I didn't want to be sitting in a nice hot bath and have fully half my body shivering above the waterline.

If you want to sink down into the water, get some measurements and be prepared to special-order a decent tub. It's surprising; even the plumbers we consulted thought that 10 inches of water is perfectly acceptable for a bath.

http://www.amazon.com/Better-Bath-Deep-Water/dp/B0001YJIGW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402516065&sr=8-1&keywords=overflow+cover

posted by slowsol on Jun 11, 2014 at 03:48:27 pm     #  

lfrost2125 posted at 01:40:29 PM on Jun 11, 2014:

MI_Builder brought up a good point that I never thought of. According to the RRP law all contractors have to be licensed or hire someone that is licensed for lead abatement for anything Pre-1978. This can get quite expensive. This rule doesn't apply if you do it yourself though.

http://www2.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-painting-program

The rule is for projects that "disturb" lead based paint.
Many bathroom projects wouldn't. Mine didn't. The painted surfaces were simply repainted. Fixtures and floor tile were replaced without disturbing any lead based paint at all.

Ripping plaster walls out down to studs probably would.

It is also important not to eat your bathroom.

posted by justread on Jun 11, 2014 at 04:42:25 pm     #  

I assumed (as did others) that "gut it" meant to studs.

posted by slowsol on Jun 11, 2014 at 06:15:10 pm     #  

As did I. See sentence number six.

But the assertion that "all contractors must be licensed for lead abatement..." could have unnecessarily scared other folks considering renovations that wouldn't disturb lead paint. The distinction wasn't made, and seemed to be valuable. Nothing personal for heaven's sake. But others read along and learn, in addition to the OP. Seemed worth mentioning.

Sentence number seven was a joke.

posted by justread on Jun 11, 2014 at 06:25:55 pm     #  

Yeah I should have been more clear stating it would only apply if disturbing lead based paint. When he said gut that to me meant down to the studs, which could disturb lead based paint depending on how the bathroom is done.

posted by lfrost2125 on Jun 11, 2014 at 10:38:57 pm     #