Toledo Talk

Milo's Meat Market

Milo's is on Lewis Avenue, and has apparently been there for ages:
http://www.toledoblade.com/Food/2013/11/10/West-Toledo-butcher-shop-still-doing-it-the-old-fashioned-way.html

I've read some things online that said Milo's has the best steaks in town.

Anyone here have any experience with this? Thoughts?

created by gamegrrl on Jul 06, 2014 at 12:53:10 pm     Comments: 63

source      versions      1 person liked this


Comments ... #

Stanley's on Stickney has the best Kielbasa around. I never heard of Milo's might have to check them out.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 06, 2014 at 01:17:14 pm     #  

Stanley's has been our go-to place for Kielbasa my whole life.

It's the on-premises aging aspect of Milo's that intrigues me, specifically.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 06, 2014 at 01:35:09 pm     #  

Milo's is good for ground chuck and steaks. Never had their kielbasa. Zavotski's kielbasa is better than Stanley's, IMO. Sacrilege to say that in Toledo but just try it.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 06, 2014 at 02:23:15 pm     #   1 person liked this

I'd have to do a side-by-side comparison for a definitive conclusion, but I've had both Stanley's and Zavotski's kielbasa, and I still prefer Stanley's. Of course, I've been eating Stanley's my whole life, and mine may be a preference due to familiarity.

Mr. Gamegrrl was just at Zavotski's the other morning, picking up some ring bologna for our smoker. It's become nearly impossible to find at "normal" grocery stores.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 06, 2014 at 02:55:28 pm     #  

Thats because the BOX stores aren't local and dont give 2 cents about customer service anymore. I can remember when you could ask for them to carry something and they actually listened, now they drop national brands for store brands almost daily.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 06, 2014 at 03:42:25 pm     #  

Seaway Marketplace still offers that kind of service, which is awesome! I just requested the ring bologna last week, and they'll be calling to let me know when it arrives. They do the same with all sorts of things, no matter how quirky. I'm sure there are limits, but they really do go the extra mile to please.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 06, 2014 at 04:13:49 pm     #   1 person liked this

Just started shopping at Zavotski's this week and can confirm that their kielbasa is outstanding (and yes better than Stanley's, which is awesome as well). Their steaks were pretty solid too, especially considering I bought the cheapies that were on sale.

Don't think I'll be heading back to House of Meats again, even if there is one within walking distance of my house.

posted by taliesin52 on Jul 06, 2014 at 04:26:18 pm     #  

Ditto here re: House of Meats. Damn shame, too, since they're everywhere now.

Mr. Gamegrrl is King of the Grill and Smoker here, and he loves the pork shoulder and chuck roasts he gets at Costco. If you have never had smoked chuck roast, then you haven't tasted heaven. Seriously. And we are hard-core carnivores who are rather persnickity.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 06, 2014 at 04:28:38 pm     #  

Kilgus on Laskey near Secor. Excellent steaks.

Scott Park Banquet Hall make the best kielbasa.

posted by bucknut on Jul 06, 2014 at 07:14:22 pm     #   1 person liked this

we shop at Milo's regularly, great quality and service. the only kielbasa I ate growing up was from Lee Williams in the point and it is still my favorite.

posted by jhop on Jul 06, 2014 at 07:29:45 pm     #  

So no one is discussing the steaks, really. Where do YOU think we could buy the BEST ribeyes in town. Not cooked. We would cook them. (Just didn't want this to turn into a restaurant thread)

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 07, 2014 at 12:09:15 am     #  

I haven't shopped at Milo's, and the only steak I bought at Zavotski's was a cheap one. That said, the best I've found in town is at Fresh Market.

posted by taliesin52 on Jul 07, 2014 at 12:45:54 am     #  

NY strips, filets and flank steak from Milo's are great in my experience. Haven't had a ribeye from there. If experience there means anything, guessing the ribeyes would be great as well.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 07, 2014 at 01:05:22 am     #   1 person liked this

Growing up in West Toledo my parents shopped at Milo's a lot for meat, except kielbasa (theirs is gritty to me for some reason). Being half polish, naturally Stanley's kielbasa was what we grew up on, and what most of my family still purchases today. I live closer to Zavotski's and love their shop. Stanley's and Zavotski's kieblasa are just about equal to me. I think the edge goes to Stanley's only because of the years growing up on it. If we host a holiday, it's Zavotski's basa.

We've purchased steak from Zavotski's and I must say they were darned good. Well trimmed, still had a good marble of fat.

For a quick stop, Zavotski's is our go to.

posted by webrioter on Jul 07, 2014 at 08:19:46 am     #  

gamegrrl posted at 12:09:15 AM on Jul 07, 2014:

So no one is discussing the steaks, really. Where do YOU think we could buy the BEST ribeyes in town. Not cooked. We would cook them. (Just didn't want this to turn into a restaurant thread)

The best steak in town I have every bought are the Prime Strip Steak/Rib eye's they sell at Churchill's. They are incredibly expensive but its prime beef, and it is amazingly good.

If you really want to get crazy order these bad boys:

http://www.lafrieda.com/Dry_Aged_USDA_Prime_Black_Angus_Rib_Eye_Steaks_p/bfsdprs.htm

Anyone heard of a place around here that sells dry Aged prime beef or up in Ann Arbor?

posted by glasscityguy on Jul 07, 2014 at 11:11:45 am     #  

Love zavotski's - I haven't had anything I didn't care for yet. Been going there since they've been open. My only complaint is that 1 of the "guys" behind the counter is consistently rude. All other aspects are good :)

posted by ajm00733 on Jul 07, 2014 at 01:26:13 pm     #  

glasscityguy posted at 11:11:45 AM on Jul 07, 2014:
gamegrrl posted at 12:09:15 AM on Jul 07, 2014:

So no one is discussing the steaks, really. Where do YOU think we could buy the BEST ribeyes in town. Not cooked. We would cook them. (Just didn't want this to turn into a restaurant thread)

The best steak in town I have every bought are the Prime Strip Steak/Rib eye's they sell at Churchill's. They are incredibly expensive but its prime beef, and it is amazingly good.

If you really want to get crazy order these bad boys:

http://www.lafrieda.com/Dry_Aged_USDA_Prime_Black_Angus_Rib_Eye_Steaks_p/bfsdprs.htm

Anyone heard of a place around here that sells dry Aged prime beef or up in Ann Arbor?

Whole Foods on Washtenaw in A2 has dry aged prime beef - for which you will pay a Whole Foods, prime price.

posted by Foodie on Jul 07, 2014 at 02:24:05 pm     #  

Regarding dry aged beef:

"Dry aged Ohio raised beef is brought into the butcher shop and broken down from hanging sides, cut to order."

http://consumer.discoverohio.com/searchdetails.aspx?detail=70679

I had NO idea!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 08, 2014 at 07:20:11 am     #  

Hit post before I meant to. That quote about dry aged beef is in reference to Stanley's!!!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 08, 2014 at 07:21:04 am     #  

In regard to the "preferred" kielbasa in Toledo, esp. in the North End (Stickney/Langrange area), I have to add my two cents to the discussion. I grew up in this neighborhood, and the two go-to markets for holiday kielbasa were Stanley's and Pete's, both located on Stickney Avenue just blocks from each other. There were just as long of lines outside of Pete's Market wrapped along the sidewalk waiting to get in as there were at Stanley's, sometimes seemingly longer. About half the population was loyal to Pete's kielbasa and proclaimed it to be the superior kielbasa in that part of Toledo, while the other half proclaimed that Stanley's kielbasa was the best. (BTW - Pete's Market was run by the Jurkiewicz Family, who were Ukrainian, and were the founders and owners of Pete's Market from it's beginnings to when it closed in the 1990s. Petro "Pete" was the patriarch of the family, and ran the store with his wife Sofia and older son, Vasyl "Bill", the families of which lived above the market and in a house behind the store facing Twining. The younger son, Myroslav "Myron"/"Merle", was the owner and proprietor of Merle's Shoe Store next door to Pete's Market, and he and his family lived in that same building, i.e., behind the store front. It is my understanding that Stanley's market was originally founded and operated by others before the Zychowicz Family bought it out and began operating the store). Although most people who used to swear by the kielbasa from Pete's Market made by the Jurkiewicz's as the best in town now go to Stanley's to purchase their holiday and special occasion kielbasa, they (our family included) still remember Pete's kielbasa as the best! Stanley's Market gained many customers when Pete's Market closed and this formidable competitor (Pete's) no longer was a factor.
And one must admit that, when all is said and done, much of one's preferance depends on what one grew up eating.
Kip

posted by Kip_Olynad on Jul 08, 2014 at 11:21:03 am     #  

What a great story, Kip! Thank you for sharing that!

Of course now I want something I cannot have: Pete's Kielbasa. LOL!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 08, 2014 at 12:42:27 pm     #  

I miss Pete's kielbasa something awful. Especially the variety with the sweet "majeranek."

I've had some pretty good kielbasa around town - and some pretty bad - but Stanley's is still our favorite.

As for steaks: I used to shop Milo's a lot - very good meats. Steaks were among the best in town. Haven't been there for some time though.

As much as I love the Fresh Market, I've found their steaks to be hit and miss though their tenderloin is usually consistent - but pricey.

My favorite steak for flavor was always a NY Strip. However, for the last few years, we've been tending towards a lean cut when we do have a steak. Our favorite thing to do is buy a whole tenderloin from Sautter's in Sylvania. Lean as can be, very well trimmed, melts in your mouth and is often on sale for $9.99/lb. You pretty much can't go wrong with anything in Sautter's meat and poultry coolers.

I've never been a fan of House of Meats. Tried Zavotski's a couple of times - haven't been there for a couple of years - but the place always had a very off putting odor that was a turn off for me.

posted by Foodie on Jul 08, 2014 at 12:52:42 pm     #  

I pick up beef tenderloin when it's on sale at Sofo's for around $5.99/lb. They're skinny things though. I'll have to check out Sautter's. Never been there!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 08, 2014 at 03:03:57 pm     #  

Gamegrrl , that's because they have already cut off several filet mignon steaks off those tenderloins, they throw a couple in a cryo-vac package and sell it as tenderloins, the largest part of an uncut tenderloin can be as bog as 6" accross, I bet your getting 3-4 at the large end, hardly big enough for maybe 2 petite filets then rest is very tender tasty stew meat, hardly worth what they charge for it.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 08, 2014 at 03:14:51 pm     #  

Very true. Does make great chili though. And skewered on the grill! For steaks, give me a big ol' ribeye any day!

This thread today had made me so hungry!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 08, 2014 at 03:36:25 pm     #  

gamegrrl , you can butterfly the filet to make the portions larger... I do that and then wrap it in bacon... always comes out perfect.

For Kielbasa, Malczewski's will always be the best. I think you can still get it from their catering business.

posted by makinTV on Jul 08, 2014 at 03:59:00 pm     #  

Have never heard of Malczewski's before. Looked up their website and it does appear you can order their kielbasa and other items year round.

There appear to be some mighty good Polish eats on that list. Did they have a store or restaurant at one time?

Thanks for the tip makinTV.

posted by Foodie on Jul 08, 2014 at 04:53:43 pm     #  

Malczewski's gets my vote for kielbasa. Have to have the garlic version. They did have a store at one time on Buckingham but the neighborhood went downhill and I believe they closed it some time ago. You can buy their products from the Scott Park banquet hall. They sell handmade pierogi too.

posted by OneMoreBourbon on Jul 08, 2014 at 06:12:32 pm     #  

Is your Kielbasa chopped or ground? What I always liked about Stanley's was most of the time it was finely chopped ingredients not ground into mush. On holidays and not sure about now its been ground because of the labor involved and the quantity they have to put out for Easter/Christmas/Thanksgiving.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 08, 2014 at 06:42:34 pm     #  

"Chopped"/"Hand Cut" or "Ground"?... A very important question to ask when purchasing kielbasa!
And then, depending on the variety of sausage in question (e.g. -- "krakowska" ham sausage), it is important to ask if they have a "dry" sausage; the "dry" ("sucha krakowska" in Polish) has a much better, more intense, flavor than the "wet" ("mokra") krakowska sausage, and is usually more expensive as you are paying for more meat and less water.

Kip

posted by Kip_Olynad on Jul 08, 2014 at 07:59:35 pm     #  

Just in case anyone is interested... When at a Polish meat market and wanting to purchase the krakowska ham sausage, there are typically three choices: the "dry" ("sucha", pronounced "SOO-kha"), "semi-dry" ("obsuszana", pronounced "ob-soo-SHA-na"), and the "wet" -- sometimes called "steamed" ("mokra", pronounced "MOK-ra", or "parzona", pronounced "pa-ZHO-na"). The dryer the sausage, the more expensive it is, but also tastier!

The "dry" sausage usually does not need to be refrigerated; we usually hung it over a source of dry heat so that it continued to dry, with the outer skin even becoming somewhat shriveled. Talk about good eating!

Kip

posted by Kip_Olynad on Jul 08, 2014 at 08:29:54 pm     #  

Kip_Olynad posted at 08:29:54 PM on Jul 08, 2014:

Just in case anyone is interested... When at a Polish meat market and wanting to purchase the krakowska ham sausage, there are typically three choices: the "dry" ("sucha", pronounced "SOO-kha"), "semi-dry" ("obsuszana", pronounced "ob-soo-SHA-na"), and the "wet" -- sometimes called "steamed" ("mokra", pronounced "MOK-ra", or "parzona", pronounced "pa-ZHO-na"). The dryer the sausage, the more expensive it is, but also tastier!

The "dry" sausage usually does not need to be refrigerated; we usually hung it over a source of dry heat so that it continued to dry, with the outer skin even becoming somewhat shriveled. Talk about good eating!

Kip

krakowska is absolutely fantastic. My mom works in Warren and will swing by Hamtramck about once a month. krakowska and a nice jewish rye, please :)

posted by webrioter on Jul 09, 2014 at 08:10:54 am     #  

Welp, I'm having steak and kielbasa this weekend because of this thread. I'm interested in checking out Milo's too, never heard of them before. Thanks for this mouth watering thread gamegrrl!

posted by hunkytownsausage on Jul 09, 2014 at 09:39:27 am     #   1 person liked this

Glad to hear it, hunkytownsausage! Given your handle, I would think that was a regular occurrence. LOL!

I'm going to hunt down some dry Krakowska.

I freaking LOVE sausages. I make my own, too, when I have time. Of course, I'm not a pro. Nor do I have rich ethnic roots and generations of recipes to work with. I just dabble. My best so far has been a Russian sausage.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 09, 2014 at 09:44:24 am     #  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg8BT9bVE7s

posted by MIJeff on Jul 09, 2014 at 10:59:15 am     #   1 person liked this

You are correct gamegrrl, I freaking love ethnic sausages (heh). I'm partial to Hungarian kolbasz myself but it's all good, honestly. Never had the Russian variety though, will add that to my to do list. As I said earlier, at T-bone or ribeye is in my future this weekend.

posted by hunkytownsausage on Jul 09, 2014 at 12:21:10 pm     #  

Oh great. Big fancy corporate meeting to run at 3, and now I'll have Who Stole the Kishka running through my head all the while. LOL!

I think I need a big, thick ribeye this weekend, too!

In a similar meaty vein, does anyone here besides me (and Mr. Gamegrrl) LOVE a high-quality chuck roast fresh out of the smoker? Puts plain ol' brisket to shame, IMO.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 09, 2014 at 01:57:51 pm     #  

KISHKA! Does anyone in Toledo even sell that?

posted by endcycle on Jul 09, 2014 at 03:00:08 pm     #  

Unless somebody has stolen it, I believe Zavotski's sells it. Can't speak to the quality of it. Just remembered seeing it there and having the song pop into my head.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 09, 2014 at 04:11:38 pm     #   1 person liked this

Stanley's sells Kishka. I also saw it on the Malczewski's catering site as being something you could order.

posted by Foodie on Jul 09, 2014 at 04:28:09 pm     #  

Stanley's has kiszka. Love it.

As for steaks, I've always heard that chefs recommend a bone-in steak for best flavor. Can anyone corroborate this?

posted by Anniecski on Jul 09, 2014 at 04:29:52 pm     #  

Depends on cooking method, but generally yep. Lots of good connective tissue there.

I think this is as good a place as any to post my How To Make A Steak recipe. Do this and you will never do it differently ever again. So easy.

Food:
NY Strip steak (or any good, decently thick cut- talk to your butcher - this also works really well with nice lamb chops)
Kosher Salt
Pepper
Butter

Materials:
heavy oven-safe pan (cast iron if you have it).
tongs.
paper towels.
Stopwatch or similar.

Method:

Bring steak(s) to room temperature on your counter. Yes, it's safe to do that. Seriously. Stop being a wimp. It's fucking steak. You could likely eat it raw every day and never have a problem.

Preheat the oven to about 425-450.

Put your pan on your biggest burner and crank it to medium-high. Let the pan heat to a point where throwing a drop of water on it essentially makes the water disappear before it even hits the surface. Then let it heat some more. Go to high if your stove sucks.

Dry off the steak(s) with a paper towel COMPLETELY. Sprinkle one side VERY generously with salt and freshly ground pepper, patting it in. Using your fingers, pick up the steaks gently and put them, seasoned side down, in the pan. Only cook 2 at a time, and make sure you have lots of room around the steaks. Start your timer. season the side facing up with salt and pepper. Once you hit 2 minutes, use your tongs as gently as possible to flip the steaks. Try to get them right in the same spot they were in. The top side should look SERIOUSLY good.

After another 2 minutes (4 total now), quickly put a bit of butter on each steak and then take the whole pan and put it in the oven. Depending on how hot the oven is and how thick your steaks are, you're looking at 2-4 minutes for medium rare. Once done, take the pan out of the oven and put the steaks on a plate. Cover lightly with aluminum foil and let them SIT for 5 minutes before serving.

Optional: you can use the drippings in the pan to make a KILLER sauce. throw in some finely chopped white onion and garlic (or shallots - even better), then let those saute briefly. Deglaze with a cup or so of red wine. Oh, and don't believe anyone that says you can cook with crappy wine - good wines reduce into more beautiful sauces, crap wines reduce into bitter and horrible sauces. period. anyone that says anything different is wrong and needs to be set on fire then deglazed with a box of bricks. Let it reduce while stirring and scraping the bottom for the good bits, then pour over the steaks at the table.

posted by endcycle on Jul 09, 2014 at 05:05:55 pm     #   1 person liked this

Or you cook on a charcoal grill for about total of 10 minutes per side for rare, about 20 minutes per side for medium to medim well. I like to flip them every 5 minutes, season seared side after first 5 minutes, then after 10 minutes you season that side, then flip them every 5 minutes again till you reach 20 minutes. You can even get creative if you like to make the grill marks criss, turn 60 - 90 degrees on grill. Oven cooking is for wimps, real men grill their steaks hehehe

posted by MIJeff on Jul 09, 2014 at 05:39:02 pm     #   2 people liked this

Gamegrrl, can u share how your husband smokes a chuck roast? I just got a smoker in April and would like to try a chuck roast next.

Ie, what temp, what internal temp, etc...

Thanks

posted by billy on Jul 09, 2014 at 06:12:28 pm     #  

Kip: my family operated the drug store at Stickney and Ketchum from about 1910 to 1974, and my mother always swore Pete's was the best kielbasa in town. Good to hear your input on the story. Also, I wore many pair of shoes bought from Merle at his shop, and can still vividly remember him and his store.

posted by JohnnyMac on Jul 09, 2014 at 07:34:57 pm     #  

Yes!... MacMahon's Drug Store, across the street from Mayer's Ice Cream from the front on Stickney, and from the old fire house across the street on Ketcham! And it was on the other end of your same block -- near the corner of Stickney and Central -- that the car wash was located. Our good friends used to live in the house next door to the car wash, but had to relocate when they cleared that end of Stickney Ave., tearing down the car wash and either razing or relocating the houses on that part of the street (which is also probably when the drug store was taken down?). What a small world! We used to ride our bikes to Wilson Park; if we had a couple of quarters in our pockets we'd stop in to either the drug store or Mayer's, or sometimes ride a little further down Stickney to the hot dog window that was just past Bronson Ave. (BTW - Merle, who died a couple of years ago, was indeed a memorable character!) Thanks for the memories!
Kip

posted by Kip_Olynad on Jul 09, 2014 at 09:54:40 pm     #  

No great shakes on the chuck roast.

Salt and pepper for seasoning, no rub. I typically use pecan chips for beef.

Smoke it at about 210 until internal temp hits 145, usually a couple of hours.

Making the smoker to oven transition at 145 allows for both a good smoky flavor, not overpowering, and doesn't dry out the roast.

Wrap it in foil and finish in the oven at 225 until internal temp is 190-200, a couple more hours. That's about the temp that the connective tissue really renders down nicely.

This is how I prepare a standard sized chuck, which is usually much thinner that say, a pork shoulder, which can sit in the smoker for 6-8 hours or more before it goes to the oven.

posted by prairieson on Jul 10, 2014 at 12:31:52 am     #   1 person liked this

Thanks for posting this, sweetie! There you have it, Billy! Prairieson/Mr. Gamegrrl's Magic Chuck Roast! My name for it, not his. LOL!

We only 'discovered' how great chuck roast is in the smoker about a year ago. It's wicked good.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 10, 2014 at 08:00:42 am     #  

endcycle: This is exactly how we prepare our steaks. We grilled them for years until discovering this method. It blows grilling them out of the water.

posted by webrioter on Jul 10, 2014 at 08:33:21 am     #  

webrioter posted at 08:33:21 AM on Jul 10, 2014:

endcycle: This is exactly how we prepare our steaks. We grilled them for years until discovering this method. It blows grilling them out of the water.

I won't grill steaks anymore after having discovered that method. The sear you get is insane and the flavor just explodes. Tastes like steak SHOULD taste.

posted by endcycle on Jul 10, 2014 at 08:36:27 am     #  

100% agree. My grill see's much less use, but that's ok!

posted by webrioter on Jul 10, 2014 at 08:37:19 am     #  

JohnnyMac posted at 07:34:57 PM on Jul 09, 2014:

Kip: my family operated the drug store at Stickney and Ketchum from about 1910 to 1974, and my mother always swore Pete's was the best kielbasa in town. Good to hear your input on the story. Also, I wore many pair of shoes bought from Merle at his shop, and can still vividly remember him and his store.

Your mother was right. Pete's was the best - IMHO of course.

posted by Foodie on Jul 10, 2014 at 09:10:49 am     #  

Well hadn't used the charcoal grill in a long time, the convenience of the gas grill was so nice, but last time we bought some charcoal for the Weber and oh my god the difference was heavenly. Will have to try the oven method some day, I'm sure a fancy steakhouse probably uses that method too.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 10, 2014 at 11:03:51 am     #   1 person liked this

Soooooooooooooo... Mr. Gamegrrl (Prairieson) brought home a nice, thick bone-in ribeye from Milo's the other night. His steak prep method is exactly what endcycle explained above. VERY yummy!

He said it was very, very crowded when he was there, so he didn't take a lot of time to look around.

I went back yesterday and was able to peruse the meat cases and talk with Steve De Land, half of the ownership team. He showed me the meat locker and we talked for quite a while.

He also explained that while they use the term "dry aged", their dry aged meats really aren't. At least not in the sense that I was expecting. They use the term to mean "this meat has never been cryovaced." So rather than having been actively "dry aged", it's more that they've not been "wet aged".

I picked up some of their in-house kielbasa, both the regular recipe and the extra garlic. Grabbed some beautiful beef short ribs, too. And my fellow customers were NOT letting me get out of there without picking up some of the ground beef. I hear it's noteworthy. :-)

I'd like to do this kielbasa justice, so any pointers for cooking it are very welcome. I typically parboil, then stick it in the oven, but I would love to know the best way to do it.

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 13, 2014 at 12:16:02 pm     #  

"I'd like to do this kielbasa justice, so any pointers for cooking it are very welcome. I typically parboil, then stick it in the oven, but I would love to know the best way to do it."

Indirect, low heat on the grill will do it justice. The casing will develop a wonderful, crispy snap. Enjoy!

posted by Foodie on Jul 14, 2014 at 08:36:41 am     #  

Gamegrrl, I parboil it as well, in beer. Bring it to a boil, then low and slow, covered, an hour and a half.

Afterward, I drain it and stick it in the oven at 350 for 20 minutes to a half hour. Reserve the liquid -- it makes the best sweet -n -sour cabbage!

Cut up one small head of cabbage in thin strips (think small noodles, not cole slaw). Put it in a pot with about a cup of the kielbasa liquid, add vinegar and sugar to taste. Cook until it's cooked down.

Serve with that kielbasa and some mashed potatoes, and you have a feast.

posted by Anniecski on Jul 14, 2014 at 09:45:06 am     #  

^^Even better!

posted by Foodie on Jul 14, 2014 at 09:50:40 am     #  

anniecski, for your kapusta, do you add the kielbasa liquid to water, or cook the cabbage in JUST the kielbasa liquid? Do you add the vinegar and sugar at the end, or do you cook that as well? And how much do you start with (vinegar and sugar)? I've tried it a few times, but could never get it to come out "Polish Wedding Style"! Have you ever made Kfas? It's a soup made from ham bone, smoked hocks, milk and vinegar. With that, you don't add the vinegar until the meat has boiled and the broth somewhat cools...

posted by llz on Jul 14, 2014 at 12:35:05 pm     #  

For kielbasa, we ( me, my mom, my grandma) have always boiled it in water for 20 minutes, then roast in the oven for 1 1/2-2 hours at 350, with some of the water that was used to boil it. Everyone always says ours tastes so good. And yes, it comes from Stanleys.

posted by llz on Jul 14, 2014 at 12:45:09 pm     #  

llz, we always buy Stanley's, too. I grew up down the street from the store. My dad did, too, come to think of it.

For kapusta, I use just the kielbasa liquid, and not even everything out of the pot, because there is a LOT of kielbasa liquid. (It's really good when there's little bits of kielbasa scraped up from the pan, too. OMG, I'm getting hungry!)

I use about a half cup of sugar and a half cup of vinegar, give or take, depending on how much cabbage I have. I know some places put sauerkraut in with it, but I feel like that makes it a little too sour for my taste.

posted by Anniecski on Jul 14, 2014 at 12:54:17 pm     #  

I prefer grilling kielbasa, but our oven method is bake covered for an hour with water a little water in the pans, then remove foil and cook another hour turning every 15 minutes, gives it that browning effect.

posted by MIJeff on Jul 14, 2014 at 01:17:40 pm     #  

Thanks for all the great technique sharing!

I ended up doing a parboil for 35 minutes (165F internal temp) in water, with a quartered onion, crushed garlic, marjoram, bay leaf, mustard seeds and peppercorns. When it reached temp, I put it in the oven at 325F, turning it once, to get it brown and snappy.

Something I learned this time around: DO NOT PIERCE THE SKINS. Leave them whole.

So, for whatever reason, this was the best kielbasa I have ever cooked in over 30 years of cooking it. It was VERY flavorful and juicy. PERFECT!

posted by gamegrrl on Jul 14, 2014 at 01:49:32 pm     #  

this thread is making me terribly hungry

posted by upso on Jul 14, 2014 at 03:31:31 pm     #   1 person liked this