Toledo Talk

Sewer rates

Looks like council is looking at increasing sewer rates by 7.9 percent. It will raise about $500 million to help clean up the waterways.

created by renegade on Aug 11, 2014 at 11:12:33 pm     Comments: 11

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Should have specified that it's Toledo City Council looking at the increase.

posted by renegade on Aug 11, 2014 at 11:13:08 pm     #  

An alleged crisis is followed by alleged concern from politicians and then real increases in taxes, fees, and assessments with the new-found money allegedly going to the alleged problem.

Aug 12, 2014 - Toledo Blade - Mayor pleads for U.S., state help

Toledo Mayor D. Michael Collins sent a letter on Monday to President Obama, Gov. John Kasich, 18 members of the Great Lakes congressional delegation, and 10 members of the Ohio General Assembly that implores them to do whatever it takes financially to get Toledo through the 2014 algae season and to pass tougher laws that ensure the area‘s 500,000 residents aren’t left scurrying for bottled water again.

I thought Collins was adamant about not getting help from the feds.

Unless they have a magic wand, what can the federal and state governments do for 2014? Collins should know governments don't operate that fast.

Besides, we don't need any help from the state nor the feds. We have access to good water, located next door in the suburb of Oregon, even though they also get their water from Lake Erie.

More from the Blade story:

Mr. Collins announced his intent to send the letter during a meeting with The Blade’s editorial board and other top editors on Monday that lasted more than two hours. The mayor’s chief of staff, Bob Reinbolt, was also present.

Collins and Reinbolt got called into the principal's office.


Aug 11, 2014 shoddy column by Tom Walton who should know better.

Mr. Kovacik has been warning us all of an ecological catastrophe for the past few years.

“This is exactly what I would have predicted,” he says. “The toxic algae is being fed by nutrients and phosphorus, but pathogens are dangerously contributing to the toxicity.”

The pathogens, he is convinced, are coming from Facility 3, the man-made landfill that juts into Maumee Bay.

Agricultural runoff into the Maumee River is a major source of the phosphorus. But the City of Bowling Green draws its water from the river and was not affected by the crisis in Toledo and its suburbs.

But Walton never mentioned that one Toledo suburb, Oregon, was also unaffected by the water crisis, and he never mentioned that Oregon gets its water from Lake Erie.

http://www.oregonohio.org/Water/water-plant.html

Located in Lake Erie about 16 feet deep and 1.5 miles from shore is Oregon's intake crib. The Crib is totally submerged and connected to the City's Low Pressure Pumping Station located near Anchor Point Marina.

I'm unsure what point Walton attempted to make, but I think that Oregon having good Lake Erie water two weekends ago blew it apart.

Bowling Green unaffected.
Oregon unaffected.
Toledo effed-up.

Maybe the explanation for Toledo's problem is good ole fashioned incompetence and malfeasance.

More from the Aug 12 Blade story:

Mayor Collins said the recent crisis at the water plant has also caused him to realign part of his leadership team.

Tim Murphy, the city’s environmental services commissioner, will replace David Leffler as the water plant’s commissioner, with Mr. Leffler announcing his resignation.

Mr. Reinboilt, as chief of staff, will now directly oversee public utilities, and the city's assistant chief of staff, Joel Mazur, will oversee public service and safety, including oversight of the city's police and fire departments, with Mr. Mazur continuing to report to Mr. Reinbolt.

I wonder if the other communities that receive Toledo water feel better.

posted by jr on Aug 12, 2014 at 01:08:15 am     #   3 people liked this

I have to ask a question here. It may be a stupid question, but it's something the has been bugging the heck out of me.

If Oregon's water supply is fine, and Oregon's water intake is further out and deeper, why doesn't Toledo just relocate the water intake?

posted by gamegrrl on Aug 12, 2014 at 08:01:50 am     #  

Oregon's is not as far from shore as Toledo's. Deeper is relative in 15 feet of water. Their structure is completely submerged, however.
They may have all the blades on their flocculator.

They also didn't have a false positive that set the whole reaction in motion.

posted by justread on Aug 12, 2014 at 09:44:01 am     #   2 people liked this

justread posted at 09:44:01 AM on Aug 12, 2014:

Oregon's is not as far from shore as Toledo's. Deeper is relative in 15 feet of water. Their structure is completely submerged, however.
They may have all the blades on their flocculator.

They also didn't have a false positive that set the whole reaction in motion.

This.

Also, Oregon's administration is not trying to unilaterally impose arbitrary levels for a contaminant of uncertain toxicity on its own water system. None of the regulatory agencies in the U.S. have established standards for microcystin, and the Collins administration has - for unknown reasons - decided that it must wage some sort of crusade against this toxin.

posted by historymike on Aug 12, 2014 at 10:29:11 am     #  

My office is across the street from the Ohio Building where the water department offices are located. There is no need to increase our water bills if they would run it like a private corporation. I have stopped in before to pay my sisters water bill for her several weeks ago and there was a cashier reading a book. I go to the Biggby coffee shop in the building almost every day and pass by the building at lunch time, and there is always a bunch of water department employees outside taking smoke breaks.

That department is always creating high paying jobs for the mayor's puppets when their screwup's become public. They need to be investing money in cleaning up the waterways, not creating unnecessary six figure a year jobs.

posted by classylady on Aug 12, 2014 at 09:04:26 pm     #   2 people liked this

wait... people in the water department are making six figures a year?

posted by nits on Aug 12, 2014 at 10:37:32 pm     #  

Probably why they keep raising the water rates.

posted by bikerdude on Aug 12, 2014 at 11:19:35 pm     #  

classylady posted at 09:04:26 PM on Aug 12, 2014:

My office is across the street from the Ohio Building where the water department offices are located. There is no need to increase our water bills if they would run it like a private corporation. I have stopped in before to pay my sisters water bill for her several weeks ago and there was a cashier reading a book. I go to the Biggby coffee shop in the building almost every day and pass by the building at lunch time, and there is always a bunch of water department employees outside taking smoke breaks.

That department is always creating high paying jobs for the mayor's puppets when their screwup's become public. They need to be investing money in cleaning up the waterways, not creating unnecessary six figure a year jobs.

Ok.

Is it the responsibility for the water treatment and distribution department to clean up waterways? Or would that be a different department or organization?

posted by justread on Aug 13, 2014 at 06:30:23 am     #   3 people liked this

Speaking of water, and sewage....after Detroit got all that rain Monday, I'll bet the Detroit river got a buttload (no pun intended) of sewage dumped into it. Which means of course, it continued down into lake Erie. Yech

posted by JeepMaker on Aug 13, 2014 at 10:14:21 am     #  

That makes me think of the Raisin River up in Monroe, Dundee always had a problem when it rained hard with dumping raw sewage into the river also.

posted by MIJeff on Aug 13, 2014 at 11:39:41 am     #