Toledo Talk

Looking for a Leathersmith or someone that works with leather.

Does anyone know of a person that works with leather that can make something from scratch and is located in the Greater Toledo Area?

created by GTVT on Aug 15, 2014 at 02:45:19 pm     Comments: 19

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Oh boy!

I'm gonna grab a bag of popcorn and watch the smart-a$$ responses roll in on this one.........

posted by Foodie on Aug 15, 2014 at 03:02:22 pm     #   1 person liked this

http://www.oneinthechambergear.net

posted by jhop on Aug 15, 2014 at 03:02:30 pm     #   1 person liked this

To CLARIFY, I am looking to have 2 ax sheaths/carriers/holsters for 2 different sized axes made up for carrying in various situations.

posted by GTVT on Aug 15, 2014 at 03:19:30 pm     #  

To clarify even further, its for a bushcrafting (backpacking) project.

posted by GTVT on Aug 15, 2014 at 03:23:47 pm     #  

jhop,

Thank You! They didn't come up on an Internet search, and the only place that did, had an article about them closing.

I called the place and talked to the owner. He is very interested in the project.

posted by GTVT on Aug 15, 2014 at 04:38:07 pm     #  

Darn. Just got the butter melted.

posted by Mariner on Aug 16, 2014 at 08:10:37 am     #  

GTVT posted at 03:19:30 PM on Aug 15, 2014:

To CLARIFY, I am looking to have 2 ax sheaths/carriers/holsters for 2 different sized axes made up for carrying in various situations.

not+to+mention+the+beard

posted by Ace_Face on Aug 16, 2014 at 09:10:25 am     #   2 people liked this

I saw this group at the Old West End festival:

http://www.midrealm.org/redspears/

From their handout:

Members of the SCA learn about the past by researching period arts, crafts, and traditions and then experience history by recreating it.

Armoring
Calligraphy & Illumination
Ceramics & Pottery
Cooking
Costuming
Dancing
Fiber Arts (weaving, spinning, etc)
Gardening & Herbalism
Heraldry
Leatherworking
Medieval games
Metalworking
Music (vocal and instrumental)
Needlework
Poetry & Literature
Woodworking
and many more

You can see artisans practicing their skills at workshops and events.

I think one of the artisans from their group at the OWE did leatherworking. Maybe it was armoring. A couple weavers were present. They made their own clothing, including items that they made from leather.

If you can find a contact, I'm certain they could help you.

posted by jr on Aug 16, 2014 at 09:30:26 am     #  

GTVT, I sent you a private message with an email address of someone affiliated with the local SCA.

Back in April on 419 Day, I bought two small handmade leather items at the Maker's Mart, but that artist/craftsman lived near Cleveland.

Maybe check with the Arts Commission for a local person.

http://theartscommission.org

posted by jr on Aug 16, 2014 at 09:57:46 am     #  

Thanks JR, I will look into them!

For the others, I am looking for something like this: http://www.raymears.com/Bushcraft_Product/832-Woodlore-Folding-Buck-Saw-Case/

I want to carry: http://www.amazon.com/Gransfors-Bruks-425-Outdoor-Axe/dp/B0041TMPHW/ref=sr_1_7?s=lawngarden&ie=UTF8&qid=1408199671&sr=1-7

AND: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0034YXRZE/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=36LMBT9ZUUSCD&coliid=I29MUIMPC3SSFO

OR: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003DL73LM/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=36LMBT9ZUUSCD&coliid=I3IFYRALDXS7LQ

on a backpack : http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005TAGYGA/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=206X5R6Y2Q5GI&coliid=I2WEDQXM7XC0DL,

OR: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005TUF0Z6/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=206X5R6Y2Q5GI&coliid=I1WLBPNFBT0333&psc=1,

and as stated, slung over my shoulder if/when the pack is left at camp.

Anyone on here a bushcrafter/fieldcrafter? Thanks to the water crisis, not to mention current National/World events, prepping became a tad bit more personal for me. I don't live in an area where staying in place sitting around waiting for the Government to react is an option, however according to my research, I am outside what I shall refer to as the "48 hour anarchy zone".

So much to learn, but beats sitting at home virtually rotting! Is it even legal to chop down a dead tree in the middle of the woods anymore? :-)

posted by GTVT on Aug 16, 2014 at 11:00:40 am     #  

The wood shop on Arlington redid a couple of old chairs for me a few years ago the type that had tooled leather seats. You might try them. It's on Arlington just off Detroit.

posted by fred on Aug 16, 2014 at 11:26:18 am     #  

Dmitry's shoe repair on airport by Home Depot has done a lot of leather work for me including redoing a custom leather satchel I brought back from Germany. I highly recommend them

posted by Dappling2 on Aug 16, 2014 at 11:52:53 am     #  

I've always found the Nick Adams basic equipment list for camping and fishing to be interesting.

(Items mentioned in the Hemingway story Big Two-Hearted River )

  • backpack
  • three blankets
  • cigarettes
  • map
  • shoes
  • wool socks
  • trousers
  • belt
  • khaki shirt
  • hat
  • ax
  • canvas tent
  • rope
  • cheesecloth to keep mosquitoes out of tent
  • paper sack of long nails
  • can of pork and beans
  • can of spaghetti
  • frying pan
  • wire grill with legs, used to cook over the fire
  • spoon
  • large, folding knife for slicing bread and cleaning fish
  • tomato catchup
  • bread
  • tin plate
  • folding canvas bucket to haul water from the stream
  • coffee
  • coffee pot
  • can of apricots
  • tin cup
  • sugar
  • matches
  • bottle to hold grasshoppers that were used for trout fishing bait
  • buckwheat flour for flapjacks - one cup of flour, one cup of water
  • can of cooking grease
  • apple butter
  • oiled paper to hold food
  • big onion for onion sandwiches
  • condensed milk
  • leather fishing rod case
  • fly rod
  • fishing reel
  • fishing line
  • aluminum box of leaders
  • "book" of fishing hooks
  • fish landing net
  • long flour sack held together with a cord to hold caught fish

posted by jr on Aug 16, 2014 at 11:54:54 am     #  

I recommend this man:
The Center for Traditional Arts
Cliff Pequet
PO Box 153
160 Morton St.
Shipshewana, IN 46565
574 596 1022

He's not local, but it's fun to visit Shipshewana and the drive isn't all that bad.

posted by madjack on Aug 16, 2014 at 04:51:37 pm     #  

odd how this internet thing works out. i was just on central near king and there is a store called bison leather on the south side of street near wendys.....could be worth a try.

posted by fred on Aug 16, 2014 at 06:13:30 pm     #  

Thanks everyone for your input!

From the research I have done, leather isn't the right material for my needs. Some say chemicals in the tanning process will leach into the wood when wet and leather retains moisture longer than most materials. So I was thinking about cowboys with their saddle mounted lever action rifle carriers, how did they avoid this back in the day. I found out they (rifle carriers) are called scabbards and a whole new world of products pop up!

So after about a week of looking, I finally picked up the right keywords for what I am looking for which is "scabbard". Searches for AX cases, packs, carriers, straps, covers didn't get me anywhere. So NOW I have a great starting point, and all I need to do is modify a shotgun scabbard to meet my needs EXACTLY!

I still don't know what they did back in the day to keep their rifles from rusting and softening the wood stocks/hand guards while in the leather scabbards, but modern materials are MUCH lighter and more weather resistant than leather.

Again, thanks for the help!

posted by GTVT on Aug 16, 2014 at 08:34:36 pm     #  

It pretty much depended on the cowboy. The idea of keeping your pistol in a holster or scabbard is pretty recent; it was most often kept in your pocket, if you carried it. Many people would put wax on the pocket where they carried their pistol. While a rifle might be kept in a scabbard, the only reason to carry a rifle is if you thought you might need it, and then the best place to carry it was in your right hand.

In order to keep anything dry, like powder, etc., you wrapped it in oil cloth which is what your slicker was made of. More to the point was the fact that black powder is corrosive, and the corrosion started right after you pulled the trigger and the gun went off. If you were going to keep your rifle or pistol in good service, you had to wash it out immediately. You'd then dry and oil it, and you could be sure it would shoot straight the next time you needed it.

I think I have my father's old boy scout hatchet around somewhere, which had a leather belt scabbard with it. The hatchet never showed any signs of rust or deterioration, nor did the wood. I kind of think it's worth mentioning that most knife sheaths are made of leather, which seems to work out pretty well.

The real bottom line back in the old days was that if you wanted it to last, whatever it was, you took care of it.

posted by madjack on Aug 16, 2014 at 09:14:25 pm     #  

Odd thing about the old days... the more things change the more they remain the same.

posted by Mariner on Aug 17, 2014 at 07:39:20 am     #   1 person liked this

yeah unfortunately a lot of things stay the same.

posted by MIJeff on Aug 17, 2014 at 12:11:57 pm     #