Toledo Talk

Generations Communications

I am mystified -- hope TTers can help me understand something. I work remotely with several others, and the younger coworkers leave voicemail messages always followed by "Call me when you get this message."

Is it not understood that the message is sufficient -- am I rude to not call them to let them know that I just listened to their message? If I do call, should I leave a message saying that I got their message :-)

I've never had anyone my age or older sign off this way ... so just wondering. Thanks.

created by viola on Aug 20, 2014 at 12:37:24 pm     Comments: 11

source      versions


Comments ... #

hell, I'm impressed that they want to actually T A L K vs text

posted by justareviewer on Aug 20, 2014 at 12:46:40 pm     #  

I usually respond to voice mails like that with an email.

posted by upso on Aug 20, 2014 at 12:52:46 pm     #   2 people liked this

I think it's just a figure of speech.

posted by slowsol on Aug 20, 2014 at 12:53:16 pm     #  

You are being too darned nice or maybe old-fashioned sigh. Return the call when it is optimum for you.

posted by Mariner on Aug 20, 2014 at 12:58:44 pm     #  

"If I do call, should I leave a message saying that I got their message"

Please do. I want to see how long you can keep it going.

"Hi Viola, Sorry I missed you, blah blah, call me when you get this message."
Followed by:
"Hi, it's Viola, Sorry I missed you. I wanted to let you know that I got your message. Call me when you get this message."
Followed by:
"Hi Viola, Got your message that you got my message. Thanks. Call me when you get this message."
Followed by:
"Hi, it's Viola again, just wanted to let you know that I got your message thanking me for calling you back when I got your message. Call me when you get this message."

posted by justread on Aug 20, 2014 at 01:06:50 pm     #   1 person liked this

upso posted at 12:52:46 PM on Aug 20, 2014:

I usually respond to voice mails like that with an email.

I am an email person by preference, as I can chunk my communications into time slots that better fit my schedule and knock out a bunch of interactions faster and more efficiently. I also find calls and texts distracting when I am reading, grading, writing, or doing anything else that requires more than a few brain cells.

However, I love using upso's approach when I have a caller or texter who seems to lack either courtesy or tact, or for whom the nagging subconscious voice is telling me I need a (virtual) paper trail of some substance.

posted by historymike on Aug 20, 2014 at 01:32:33 pm     #  

I find that I sometimes need to have business conversations that I don't want written or forwarded.

posted by justread on Aug 20, 2014 at 01:58:58 pm     #   2 people liked this

justread posted at 01:58:58 PM on Aug 20, 2014:

I find that I sometimes need to have business conversations that I don't want written or forwarded.

Ah, the communication dance. It can be interesting to watch the ballet when one party wants a written trail and the other is desperately trying to use the phone to avoid leaving a paper trail.

posted by historymike on Aug 20, 2014 at 02:44:21 pm     #  

Justread, I think I'll try your suggestion and see what happens. :-)

What I didn't explain in original post is that we all work different shifts, and the burden of daily operations is taken up by the next person on schedule. When my time rolls around 3 days later, I listen to voice mails first thing, and find " ... call me when ..." from the twentysomethings. At that point, there is absolutely no value in making the call, since all work matters have been handled by 2 additional employees (plus a supervisor and a boss).

Yet I fear getting a reputation as a rude coworker if I don't comply with their request and let them know I finally listened to their 3-day-old message.

The spouse pointed out that a text-happy generation may not be used to a little bit of uncertainty, as sometimes happens in the workplace. From their perspective, all information is instantly knowable and transmittable 24/7.

posted by viola on Aug 20, 2014 at 02:48:31 pm     #  

historymike posted at 01:32:33 PM on Aug 20, 2014:
upso posted at 12:52:46 PM on Aug 20, 2014:

I usually respond to voice mails like that with an email.

I am an email person by preference, as I can chunk my communications into time slots that better fit my schedule and knock out a bunch of interactions faster and more efficiently. I also find calls and texts distracting when I am reading, grading, writing, or doing anything else that requires more than a few brain cells.

However, I love using upso's approach when I have a caller or texter who seems to lack either courtesy or tact, or for whom the nagging subconscious voice is telling me I need a (virtual) paper trail of some substance.

I don't mind email, but sometimes I think that email leads to actually spending more time than necessary on a topic. I have had email correspondence going back and forth for weeks on an issue that probably could have been resolved in a 10 minute phone call. And when it is a topic of some sensitivity, I always prefer phone calls because it is too easy for people to read a tone into emails that just isn't what the writer intended.

posted by Ace_Face on Aug 20, 2014 at 03:56:17 pm     #  

Ace - just like posts on a board like this, its very hard sometimes for people to get sarcasm, humor, or genuine indifference sometimes hehe.

posted by MIJeff on Aug 20, 2014 at 04:25:26 pm     #