Toledo Talk

Any train fans (or pros) in this group?

I live in the Old West End and just heard a really weird noise coming from the direction of the NS tracks that run parallel to Detroit Ave.

Wondering if what I heard was a derailment. Didn't sound loud enough to qualify as a crash.

created by Bandito on Jun 27, 2016 at 12:02:37 am     Comments: 4

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posted by nana on Jun 27, 2016 at 09:54:22 pm     #  

I live near there. Sometimes I think they slam the cars together to link them (for lack of a better term) and it sounds like an earthquake. I'd also like to find out what the rules are for blowing the horn when approaching a RR crossing. I swear some of the conductors get off on blowing the horn numerous times and for a long time when going through a crossing. I've waked and biked at RR crossings when a train goes by. For the life of me I can't see how anyone "accidentally" gets hit by a train. Those things are so loud and make the ground shake. You can't stand near them without holding your ears.

posted by hockeyfan on Jun 28, 2016 at 03:50:15 pm     #  

"Sometimes I think they slam the cars together to link them" - In flat switching, rail cars are diverted to the proper track to complete a train by one of two methods, either by “manually kicking” or “shoving to couple.” When rail cars are kicked, they are uncoupled from the switching locomotive while in motion, allowed to roll freely and are expected to couple with the other rail cars upon impact with the new train. When rail cars are shoved to couple, they are not uncoupled from the switching locomotive until they have already coupled with and are secured to the new train.
"I'd also like to find out what the rules are for blowing the horn when approaching a RR crossing" -
Under the Train Horn Rule (49 CFR Part 222), locomotive engineers must begin to sound train horns at least 15 seconds, and no more than 20 seconds, in advance of all public grade crossings.
If a train is traveling faster than 60 mph, engineers will not sound the horn until it is within ¼ mile of the crossing, even if the advance warning is less than 15 seconds.
There is a "good faith" exception for locations where engineers can’t precisely estimate their arrival at a crossing and begin to sound the horn no more than 25 seconds before arriving at the crossing.
Train horns must be sounded in a standardized pattern of 2 long,
In flat switching, rail cars are diverted to the proper track to complete a train by one of two methods, either by “manually kicking” or “shoving to couple.” When rail cars are kicked, they are uncoupled from the switching locomotive while in motion, allowed to roll freely and are expected to couple with the other rail cars upon impact with the new train. When rail cars are shoved to couple, they are not uncoupled from the switching locomotive until they have already coupled with and are secured to the new train.
1 short and 1 long blasts. The pattern must be repeated or prolonged until the lead locomotive or lead cab car occupies the grade crossing. The rule does not stipulate the durations of long and short blasts.
The maximum volume level for the train horn is 110 decibels which is a new requirement. The minimum sound level remains 96 decibels.
"For the life of me I can't see how anyone "accidentally" gets hit by a train" - point taken - knuckleheads abound, but rolling rail cars in a switching yard are eerily quiet while in motion.

posted by justareviewer on Jun 28, 2016 at 05:04:13 pm     #  

Didn't sound like flat switching to me, or even the sound of the couplers when the slack is taken out. I've worked in a rail yard and think I would have recognized the sounds of ordinary flat switching. This was different; more of a continuous sound, rather eerie.

As for blowing the horns when they cross Sylvania, I'm far away enough to love it.

posted by Bandito on Jun 28, 2016 at 08:01:38 pm     #