Toledo Talk

Toledo night life 1979

Good story on makin' the scene in Toledo back in the day. http://www.toledohistorybox.com/2017/06/06/toledo-night-life-1979/

created by breaker on Jul 02, 2017 at 04:19:42 pm     Comments: 25

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As a UT student from 1969-1970, I will testify to many fine watering holes in the general campus area. I met a fine lady at The Draught House (Byrne/Dorr) in those days and fondly recall a drunken episode at the Stein and Pitcher when I foolishly parked in the University Lanes lot behind the building.

Came out after closing hour to find no car.....towed somewhere on Matzinger Rd. ......needed cash to get it out...my drinking partner (a priest) called someone to get us, got cash from the parish rectory, and bailed out my car.

Yes, I paid it back :) .....not funny then, but hey, I look for those signs even today......lesson learned....

posted by ThePolishFalcon on Jul 02, 2017 at 09:42:03 pm     #  

My take away is Thou shall not drink with clergy.

posted by Mariner on Jul 03, 2017 at 06:38:51 am     #  

Cool article. Having been too young to go anywhere back then (or not even being alive), I find that whole era and the places people used to frequent fascinating. It sounds like a rowdier or at least looser time with the 18 drinking age. Are there even singles bars anymore? It's interesting that many of the bars and nightclubs were in parts of town that investors probably wouldn't go near today, like both the old and new Carousel Clubs, the original Ottawa Tavern, and the Aku Aku Room. Renee's - still standing and currently open as Realm - was new at the time and Steppenwolf played there.

Of course I clicked on the Aku Aku link and got lost reading those archives for a good hour. It's mind blowing to think that Toledo was home to a Polynesian themed mafia hangout with nightly performers direct from Vegas. Add that to the list of things that needs to one day be recreated, maybe minus the mobsters. The article says it cost $750,000 to build in 1960, which would be $6.2 million today. Very hard to picture that kind of attraction where the current Rally's stands (1111 W Bancroft).

posted by mixman on Jul 03, 2017 at 04:15:29 pm     #  

Renee's - still standing and currently open as Realm - was new at the time and Steppenwolf played there.

I remember Renee's at Glenbyrne where Henry J's was, not where Roxanne's was.

posted by justread on Jul 03, 2017 at 05:03:21 pm     #  

Whoops, I meant the Byrnegate Club. That's what the ad on this facebook page referenced. A lot of information to process!

posted by mixman on Jul 03, 2017 at 06:15:17 pm     #  

Is the Brass Bell the mentioned on Bancroft what would have been the Pub in the 80s? I'm surprised the Stein didn't get mentioned.

I never knew Max and Ermas used to be a hot nightspot:)

posted by jamesteroh on Jul 04, 2017 at 12:08:54 am     #  

It wasn't bad. Seemed to have better luck at the Ramada on Reynolds and Friday's when it was new for bait casting and sport f*****g. All pre hiv days and nobody wore raincoats.

posted by Mariner on Jul 04, 2017 at 07:41:32 am     #  

Having been too young to go anywhere back then (or not even being alive), I find that whole era and the places people used to frequent fascinating. It sounds like a rowdier or at least looser time with the 18 drinking age.

The drinking age was 21, as was the voting age. Men were drafted for the Vietnam war at age 18, which is eventually why the voting age was lowered to 18.

Going out, you had to dress the part, which is one of the things I miss most about the old days. If you were wearing jeans you wouldn't be allowed inside a lot of these places. The service was better, and the atmosphere was much more congenial.

posted by madjack on Jul 04, 2017 at 12:10:22 pm     #  

jamesteroh posted at 12:08:54 AM on Jul 04, 2017:

Is the Brass Bell the mentioned on Bancroft what would have been the Pub in the 80s? I'm surprised the Stein didn't get mentioned.

I never knew Max and Ermas used to be a hot nightspot:)

Yes. Brass Bell was where The Pub was later.

posted by justread on Jul 04, 2017 at 04:18:35 pm     #  

I remember Max & Erma's was a pretty fun place for singles back in the late 70's. All the tables had phones on them and you could call other tables. This led to prank calls, flirting, and was a fun way to meet people. If a guy called another table and asked a girl if he could buy her a drink and the answer was no, at least he got shot down over the phone, and not in person, haha.

The phone on the tables concept sounds kind of dumb, but it actually was pretty fun !

posted by foodie88 on Jul 04, 2017 at 04:34:42 pm     #  

I was raging all night in July of 79' mostly because I was 4 months old and had gas. But... Embers, the current Manny's Italian, was a singles bar in the late 90's. I was a teenager that had a friend who DJ'd there. Put on a suit and tie and you could drink there. Jack and Coke and dances with cougars. Good times.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 04, 2017 at 06:16:48 pm     #  

*Mancy's

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 04, 2017 at 06:17:45 pm     #  

I thought the Embers is where red robin (and before that Damons) is. What bar was there?

posted by jamesteroh on Jul 04, 2017 at 07:16:56 pm     #  

jamesteroh posted at 07:16:56 PM on Jul 04, 2017:

I thought the Embers is where red robin (and before that Damons) is. What bar was there?

That was The Willows.

posted by breaker on Jul 04, 2017 at 07:30:09 pm     #   1 person liked this

breaker posted at 07:30:09 PM on Jul 04, 2017:
jamesteroh posted at 07:16:56 PM on Jul 04, 2017:

I thought the Embers is where red robin (and before that Damons) is. What bar was there?

That was The Willows.

Had a baby sitter who's boyfriend (and now business owner and respected member of the community) valeteted at Willow's and would drive various Mercedes and Jaguars over to show off.

posted by TrilbyGuy on Jul 04, 2017 at 07:42:03 pm     #  

Thanks!

posted by jamesteroh on Jul 04, 2017 at 08:52:52 pm     #  

madjack posted at 12:10:22 PM on Jul 04, 2017:
Having been too young to go anywhere back then (or not even being alive), I find that whole era and the places people used to frequent fascinating. It sounds like a rowdier or at least looser time with the 18 drinking age.

The drinking age was 21, as was the voting age. Men were drafted for the Vietnam war at age 18, which is eventually why the voting age was lowered to 18.

Going out, you had to dress the part, which is one of the things I miss most about the old days. If you were wearing jeans you wouldn't be allowed inside a lot of these places. The service was better, and the atmosphere was much more congenial.

Drinking age for wine and liquor was always 21, but I'm sure you remember 3.2 beer which you could get at 18 until it was raised to 19 in 1982. Then up to 21 in 1988 for all hooch.

posted by Ace_Face on Jul 05, 2017 at 12:40:22 am     #   1 person liked this

True Ace unless you carried two wallets. We had a kid in high school who worked part time at the dwntwn main post office. Selective Service draft cards were mailed with a big window on the envelope showing race, height, weight, eye color and could be obtained for custom order for $5. Hugh federal crime but he was never caught. With the card you could extend it to social security cards, a few others but no driver's lic. That was too risky. When asked for it simple answer they took it away for drinking too much. Put on a coat and tie like Trilby's post above, try and drop your voice an octave and you were in like flint. Am sure the bar owners and carry-out owners laughed at it but money changed hands and that does make the world go 'round. Could have written an early script for Catch Me If You Can. The larceny was restricted to obtaining alcohol unlike today where identity theft is a major digital electronic crime. This is all divulged, of course, under loose literary license.

posted by Mariner on Jul 05, 2017 at 07:13:48 am     #  

Ace_Face posted at 12:40:22 AM on Jul 05, 2017:
madjack posted at 12:10:22 PM on Jul 04, 2017:
Having been too young to go anywhere back then (or not even being alive), I find that whole era and the places people used to frequent fascinating. It sounds like a rowdier or at least looser time with the 18 drinking age.

The drinking age was 21, as was the voting age. Men were drafted for the Vietnam war at age 18, which is eventually why the voting age was lowered to 18.

Going out, you had to dress the part, which is one of the things I miss most about the old days. If you were wearing jeans you wouldn't be allowed inside a lot of these places. The service was better, and the atmosphere was much more congenial.

Drinking age for wine and liquor was always 21, but I'm sure you remember 3.2 beer which you could get at 18 until it was raised to 19 in 1982. Then up to 21 in 1988 for all hooch.

I think 19 year olds could buy regular beer before 1988. I think the 3.2 thing went away in 1982.

posted by justread on Jul 05, 2017 at 12:51:16 pm     #  

They did away with "low" and "high beer" in Ohio when they raised the drinking age to 19 for beer.

I never understood why the drinking age for beer used to be lower than that for wine or spirits.

posted by classylady on Jul 05, 2017 at 02:37:00 pm     #  

classylady posted at 02:37:00 PM on Jul 05, 2017:

They did away with "low" and "high beer" in Ohio when they raised the drinking age to 19 for beer.

I never understood why the drinking age for beer used to be lower than that for wine or spirits.

Alcohol content. By Ohio's definition, beer had to contain less than 5% alcohol. At least I think it was five, but I might easily be wrong about the numbers. Wine could go as high as 20% alcohol.

These days I think the alcohol content of beer has been raised due to various micro-brewers and their new concoctions.

posted by madjack on Jul 05, 2017 at 04:33:55 pm     #  

This is all divulged, of course, under loose literary license.

Yeah, you're loose alright. Where's Sollecks when you need him?

Back then the photo ID wasn't prolific. Your driver's license just had text on it, as did your draft card and pretty much anything else you carried in your wallet. Anyone with access to a letter press and the knowledge to use it could crank out an ID in 30 minutes or so, and it would pass inspection. The only thing you had to remember was your birthday, as listed on your new ID.

Bouncer: What's your birthday?
Idiot: Huh?
Bouncer: Your birthday. The day you were born.
Idiot: Ah... well... I was born July 4th, 1952
Bouncer: The would make you 15. It says here that you were born in 1925, which would make you how old.
Idiot: Ah, well, pretty old?
Bouncer: Get outta here. Next!
Idiot: Can I have my ID back?

As best I can recall, we were at the door of the old Ottawa Tavern. Anyway, we had to get him a new ID along with a name he could remember. I suggested Charles Darwin, and when no one got the joke I decided not to hang with this crew anymore.

posted by madjack on Jul 05, 2017 at 04:45:53 pm     #  

From old ads and people's accounts, it sounds like Reynolds Road, specifically the area around the mall, was kind of a nightlife hub back then. There was the disco by the Turnpike (later Kipp's / Nashville's / many other names), Max & Erma's off Heatherdowns, Ramada and Holiday Inn both had bars / lounges, Dominic's Godfather Lounge, Steak & Ale, the bar at Old Town, and there's an ad on that facebook page for the original Southwyck Lounge. It says "behind the mall adjacent to Wards". Does anyone remember that place? Also what about the big nightclub behind Putt-Putt (later the comedy club). Was that there in 1979 or did it open later?

posted by mixman on Jul 16, 2017 at 03:55:24 pm     #  

Well, there was Jimmy Feak's downtown on Superior St., Benny's North and Benny's South, OB's on Tremainsville (formerly on Sylvania near Willys Parkway), The Porch of the Maidens, Henry's Bar on Dorr & Upton, The Glass Bar on N. Detroit Ave. East Toledo had a few watering holes- The Chief Tecumseh Club, Graver's Bar, The Friendly Bar.

posted by flinty on Jul 23, 2017 at 10:47:52 pm     #  

The Comedy Club started out as the original Max and Ermas. Every table had a phone with a number that hung over the table. The restrooms had a female character on the men's door pointing to the other door that had a man pointing to the other. Was fun watching the un initiated after a few cocktails. Personally , I spent way too much time and money at Benny's East playing pinball for drinks (151 and coke) and listening to the Raisin Band and East River Drive.

posted by marving on Jul 24, 2017 at 08:17:03 am     #