Toledo Talk

Tin Can Toledo ...has this been covered?

https://tincanbar.com/toledo/

Is this place open yet? Or am I correct its going into the bottom floor of the Berdan Building? I stumbled upon this.....havent seen or read any news related to its opening, not even here, which is surprising.

created by BulldogBuckeye on Nov 16, 2017 at 01:25:39 pm     Comments: 64

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I drove past it on Washington last night after an event downtown and did a double take because of the new windows and lights. If I am thinking of the right spot, roughly across from Ye Old Cock and Bull, it was lit up last night. I may have done a double-double take. Whatever it was, it sure brightened up the block.

I remember having a "damn, this is starting to look like a different town" moment. I had a business on Washington 20 years ago, and it was a significant moment to look around the WHD last night, remembering the dark nights of the late 90s, when I left downtown at night back then, I am pretty sure I was the last one.

The transformation is becoming startling.

posted by justread on Nov 16, 2017 at 01:35:57 pm     #   3 people liked this

It's been discussed a bit in the downtown thread. College bar type place out of Michigan, everything is in cans, focuses on microbrews. They're saying they want to be open around Thanksgiving, which is a week away.

posted by Johio83 on Nov 16, 2017 at 01:36:31 pm     #  

Beer menu-

https://tincanbar.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/2015-Tin-Can-CORE-for-web-full.pdf

Good prices, decent selection of styles and choices in each style.... not bad.

posted by endcycle on Nov 16, 2017 at 02:26:30 pm     #  

I walked by yesterday to be nosy. I looked in the window and it looks like they were about 75% complete. Itís located right on the corner and it seems like all of the doors/windows will open up completely. They should do a great business during games.

posted by idinspired on Nov 16, 2017 at 02:53:18 pm     #  

justread... a business on washington 20 years ago ? did you run the bait shop at superior ?

posted by enjoyeverysandwich on Nov 16, 2017 at 11:12:55 pm     #  

I heard 12-2-17 is the opening. One of the bartenders at Ralphie's is going to work there. I will give it a try !

posted by Hoops on Nov 17, 2017 at 07:55:45 am     #  

Very interesting concept and a great selection. It won't be open this week while I'm in town for Thanksgiving, but I'll have to stop by in the spring or summer.

posted by clt212 on Nov 17, 2017 at 08:52:55 am     #  

enjoyeverysandwich posted at 11:12:55 PM on Nov 16, 2017:

justread... a business on washington 20 years ago ? did you run the bait shop at superior ?

I should say yes to end the process of elimination.

Yes. Night crawlers and shiners, baby. :)

posted by justread on Nov 17, 2017 at 09:47:17 am     #  

Is that code for cathouse?

posted by Mariner on Nov 17, 2017 at 02:24:18 pm     #  

Tin Can will be opening today at 5:00p per their Facebook

posted by ckbeats21 on Nov 27, 2017 at 02:40:38 pm     #  

Holy crap. That's AHEAD of schedule. Don't tell 6th.

posted by endcycle on Nov 27, 2017 at 03:16:44 pm     #  

I drove by earlier and noticed that the doors were open. I didn't even see an exterior sign though? Seems odd to open without one.

posted by idinspired on Nov 27, 2017 at 03:24:56 pm     #  

idinspired posted at 03:24:56 PM on Nov 27, 2017:

I drove by earlier and noticed that the doors were open. I didn't even see an exterior sign though? Seems odd to open without one.

Open doors with beer inside. Toledoans will find it, sign or not.

posted by JoeyGee on Nov 27, 2017 at 03:40:52 pm     #   3 people liked this

Signs require a permit unto themselves, and permitting in this city is never a quick process. They probably just didn't want to let something like an unlicensed sign hold up their opening.

posted by Johio83 on Nov 27, 2017 at 03:48:34 pm     #  

Have any TTer's check this place out yet?

I wish they were open for lunch in Toledo. Their lunch menu at their other locations looks good.

posted by classylady on Dec 04, 2017 at 12:34:02 pm     #  

I've been four times so far, so I guess you could say I've checked it out. It's pretty good. Good spot if you're going to be with a big group, lots of space to spread out. I've only eaten there once so far. Had a grilled cheese with ham, it was pretty good. Simple, but well done. Can't really go wrong with crunchy bread and oozy cheese. Proximity will easily play the biggest factor for me, since it's even closer for me than Cock n Bull.

posted by Johio83 on Dec 04, 2017 at 12:55:13 pm     #   1 person liked this

I swung over last Friday night, The place was packed, but I suppose that is to be expected with a new bar. The layout of the bar is nice and 3 dart boards are a nice touch.(metal tip!) Drinks are priced ok, some crafts run a little on the expensive side for a 12 oz can. Someone talked me into a Peanut Butter Chocolate frozen pudding shot which turned out to be delicious.

posted by glasscityguy on Dec 06, 2017 at 11:22:38 am     #  

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

posted by In_vin_veritas on Dec 06, 2017 at 11:40:21 am     #  

This is especially a no-no on IPAs...

posted by SensorG on Dec 06, 2017 at 12:03:13 pm     #  

In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

If you drink Bud Light you deserve warm beer.

posted by Foodie on Dec 06, 2017 at 01:18:10 pm     #   7 people liked this

Foodie posted at 01:18:10 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

If you drink Bud Light you deserve warm beer.

I don't some friends do. But if I must better damn be cold.

posted by In_vin_veritas on Dec 06, 2017 at 01:54:57 pm     #  

Foodie posted at 01:18:10 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

If you drink Bud Light you deserve warm beer.

Foodie to the pit of misery. Dilly Dilly!

posted by TrilbyGuy on Dec 06, 2017 at 01:55:09 pm     #   1 person liked this

"Hey, the craft beer scene is really starting to hurt us. Turns out, people actually like things that taste good. How do we compete? Do we make a better product?"

"No, I've got a better idea - let's come up with a ridiculous catch phrase! THAT should get people buying our beers again! Dilly dilly!"

posted by Johio83 on Dec 06, 2017 at 02:02:37 pm     #  

In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

Getting a Bud Light in a place that specializes is microbrews is kinda like going to Mancy's for a hot dog. Or maybe like buying an NFL ticket to see the Browns

posted by JoeyGee on Dec 06, 2017 at 02:27:19 pm     #   2 people liked this

JoeyGee posted at 02:27:19 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

Getting a Bud Light in a place that specializes is microbrews is kinda like going to Mancy's for a hot dog. Or maybe like buying an NFL ticket to see the Browns

I believe they specialize in canned beee of all types not craft. I wouldn't call Colt 45, Hams, OE, etc craft. Point was several patrons who were drinking bud said their beer was warm.

posted by In_vin_veritas on Dec 06, 2017 at 02:44:47 pm     #  

In_vin_veritas posted at 02:44:47 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
JoeyGee posted at 02:27:19 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

Getting a Bud Light in a place that specializes is microbrews is kinda like going to Mancy's for a hot dog. Or maybe like buying an NFL ticket to see the Browns

I believe they specialize in canned beee of all types not craft. I wouldn't call Colt 45, Hams, OE, etc craft. Point was several patrons who were drinking bud said their beer was warm.

You're clearly missing the point. Those people don't deserve to live, let alone drink cold beer.

runs my fingers through my handlebar mustache and drinks craft beer from my growler

posted by slowsol on Dec 06, 2017 at 02:57:42 pm     #   3 people liked this

Budweiser's approach to criticizing craft beer in its advertisements is the equivalent of the Taco Bell commercial saying "why pay steakhouse prices when you can get a steak burrito?"

posted by Johio83 on Dec 06, 2017 at 03:03:42 pm     #   1 person liked this

slowsol posted at 02:57:42 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 02:44:47 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
JoeyGee posted at 02:27:19 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

Getting a Bud Light in a place that specializes is microbrews is kinda like going to Mancy's for a hot dog. Or maybe like buying an NFL ticket to see the Browns

I believe they specialize in canned beee of all types not craft. I wouldn't call Colt 45, Hams, OE, etc craft. Point was several patrons who were drinking bud said their beer was warm.

You're clearly missing the point. Those people don't deserve to live, let alone drink cold beer.

runs my fingers through my handlebar mustache and drinks craft beer from my growler

Dumps some powdered hops in a Miwaukee's best sells it to hipsters for 10 bucks as they complain about cost of living being so high.

posted by In_vin_veritas on Dec 06, 2017 at 03:37:41 pm     #  

Foodie posted at 01:18:10 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
In_vin_veritas posted at 11:40:21 AM on Dec 06, 2017:

Stopped in twice biggest complaint was that they are constantly restocking cans and pushung old to back instead of rotating stock. People that were drinking budlight were getting warm beer.

If you drink Bud Light you deserve warm beer.

Ironically they serve their craft beer in cans which you look down too. Good luck in a changing world.

posted by SensorG on Dec 06, 2017 at 05:16:24 pm     #  

In Europe, they drink warm beer. And they look down, too.

The world may be changing even faster there. :(

posted by justread on Dec 06, 2017 at 05:36:06 pm     #  

justread posted at 05:36:06 PM on Dec 06, 2017:

In Europe, they drink warm beer. And they look down, too.

The world may be changing even faster there. :(

Just look at a globe. Europe is on the other side of the ball, so they have to look down to see us.

I want to watch SlowSol blow the foam off the growler. It's been years since I've seen anyone with an actual growler and a real handlebar mustache.

posted by madjack on Dec 06, 2017 at 05:46:03 pm     #  

I spent three weeks in SE Asia earlier this year, and now I drink Heineken with ice, and I'm not ashamed.

posted by swampprof on Dec 06, 2017 at 05:56:23 pm     #  

madjack posted at 05:46:03 PM on Dec 06, 2017:
justread posted at 05:36:06 PM on Dec 06, 2017:

In Europe, they drink warm beer. And they look down, too.

The world may be changing even faster there. :(

Just look at a globe. Europe is on the other side of the ball, so they have to look down to see us.

I want to watch SlowSol blow the foam off the growler. It's been years since I've seen anyone with an actual growler and a real handlebar mustache.

I miss you, you bastard.

posted by justread on Dec 06, 2017 at 06:05:09 pm     #  

I've had a handlebar at a couple points in my life. I used to grow a beard for the winter, and would grow out my 'stache for the last couple weeks of it, so that I could take the beard off and have a handlebar for Kentucky Derby weekend (seemed fitting as a "cold weather is gone" kind of time frame). Now I just have a perma-beard, so no more handlestache.

posted by Johio83 on Dec 06, 2017 at 06:13:52 pm     #  

They have names for people without beards - women and children. :)

posted by SensorG on Dec 06, 2017 at 09:53:46 pm     #   1 person liked this

Go stand outside the gate at Parris Island and see how popular that statement would be.

posted by Mariner on Dec 07, 2017 at 06:36:27 am     #   1 person liked this

We have a couple of marines at work and they have the best beards.

posted by SensorG on Dec 07, 2017 at 06:43:25 am     #  

All the Tier 1 operators have great beards. And some of the IT minions. Different khakis though.

posted by justread on Dec 07, 2017 at 07:00:52 am     #  

Foodie has some very strong points on drinking. Possibly Foodie = Drunkie ????

I agree that Bud Light drinkers have poor taste. Miller light has been my go-to beer for decades. Don't say anything bad about it Drunkie.

posted by jimavolt on Dec 07, 2017 at 10:49:14 am     #  

jimavolt posted at 10:49:14 AM on Dec 07, 2017:

Foodie has some very strong points on drinking. Possibly Foodie = Drunkie ????

I agree that Bud Light drinkers have poor taste. Miller light has been my go-to beer for decades. Don't say anything bad about it Drunkie.

Miller Lite, Bud Light, Coors Light-all adjunct light beers, their parent, non light are also made from adjuncts, but offer a bit more, um, flavor. Meaning, they are filled with rice to make them cheap, consistent and sweet (like most American Food Science). You have adjusted your palate accordingly, it is what you prefer, none are qualitatively, good. They offer minute differences that disappear as the beers get colder. I watch this argument play out-essentially, here's the deal-you like something labeled beer, but in the purest sense of the word, it's the beverage that most resembles beer, but without 95% of the flavor of beer. It's what California Rolls are to sushi.

A reminder that cans are the superior beer delivery vessel.

Don't @ me.

also ++ on the beards

posted by ahmahler on Dec 07, 2017 at 11:24:12 am     #  

I am going to Tin Can tonight.....................I really hope my beer is cold, whatever kind I decide to partake !!!!

posted by Hoops on Dec 07, 2017 at 11:24:17 am     #  

I enjoy craft beer. I also find an ice cold bottle of Bud Light delicious. The mocking of domestic macro beers is disgustingly snootish. If it was good enough for my grandpa and millions of red blooded American men since him, its good enough for me. My god, America! What have we become?

posted by BulldogBuckeye on Dec 07, 2017 at 01:23:57 pm     #   1 person liked this

On the contrary jimavolt, I consume precious little beer - which is likely why I am quite particular about it.

At the risk of incurring your wrath, I happen to believe that Miller Lite is, and always has been, one of the most disgusting beverages ever concocted.

But, I'm glad you enjoy it. That's why Ho Jo's had 28 flavors of ice cream - something to suit most tastes - if you found yourself unfortunate enough to be dining at Ho Jo's.

posted by Foodie on Dec 07, 2017 at 02:31:36 pm     #   1 person liked this

BulldogBuckeye posted at 01:23:57 PM on Dec 07, 2017:

I enjoy craft beer. I also find an ice cold bottle of Bud Light delicious. The mocking of domestic macro beers is disgustingly snootish. If it was good enough for my grandpa and millions of red blooded American men since him, its good enough for me. My god, America! What have we become?

Hopefully, we've evolved.

posted by ahmahler on Dec 07, 2017 at 02:32:04 pm     #  

Went there with the boyfriend last night. They have a nice vodka selection and some unique shots on the menu. The pumpkin pudding shots were really good. They also had Snickers but we didn't try those.

My boyfriend and I each received a punch card with 50 numbers where we will receive a T-shirt if it gets full. Mine was for shots and his was for beer.

The flatbread pizzas were good. They don't have all the items on the menu listed on the website and we were told that some equipment was wired wrong and they are waiting for that to be repaired. I really wanted a sandwich with fries but fries aren't available yet.

Boyfriend had no issues with his beer not being cold. My only complaint was they use cheap plastic disposable cups.

posted by classylady on Dec 07, 2017 at 02:37:43 pm     #  

BulldogBuckeye posted at 01:23:57 PM on Dec 07, 2017:

I enjoy craft beer. I also find an ice cold bottle of Bud Light delicious. The mocking of domestic macro beers is disgustingly snootish. If it was good enough for my grandpa and millions of red blooded American men since him, its good enough for me. My god, America! What have we become?

I won't believe for a second that the recipe and ingredients haven't been cheapened to a ridiculous degree since our grandfathers were drinking the stuff. Having first-hand knowledge of what typical chain restaurants do to keep their costs consistent despite a rapidly escalating dollar, I can't believe Budweiser hasn't done the same thing.

posted by Johio83 on Dec 07, 2017 at 02:39:06 pm     #  

Starting in 1970, Budweiser became the largest buyer of Rice in the US and that hasnít changed since. If you want to see what beer your father/ grandfather drink-grab a Strohís or PBR-while not great, they are, more or less, original recipe. Iím not ashamed to throw one of those back once in a while.

posted by ahmahler on Dec 07, 2017 at 03:46:46 pm     #   1 person liked this

Bilge water. Our northern neighbors have better domestic.

posted by Mariner on Dec 07, 2017 at 03:57:49 pm     #  

ahmahler posted at 03:46:46 PM on Dec 07, 2017:

Starting in 1970, Budweiser became the largest buyer of Rice in the US and that hasnít changed since. If you want to see what beer your father/ grandfather drink-grab a Strohís or PBR-while not great, they are, more or less, original recipe. Iím not ashamed to throw one of those back once in a while.

Haven't had a PBR in ages - not that I'm avoiding just that the opportunity hasn't presented itself.

I'll also throw back a Stroh's or two when working outside on a hot summer day. I'd agree. Pretty much tastes like it did 40 years ago.

posted by Foodie on Dec 07, 2017 at 04:15:25 pm     #  

Went to Phoenix 40yrs ago and couldn't wait to have a Coors. When people heard was from Ohio wanted to know if I had brought any Stroh's with me. Human nature I guess to want what we can't have.

posted by Mariner on Dec 07, 2017 at 04:33:31 pm     #  

When my buddy and I moved down to Florida after college, we drank Yuengling like crazy. And then after about a year, it set in that it's not actually any better than its competition, it was just exotic to us.

posted by Johio83 on Dec 07, 2017 at 04:36:37 pm     #  

And then after about a year, it set in that it's not actually any better than its competition, it was just exotic to us.

You mean Florida?

posted by justread on Dec 07, 2017 at 05:16:36 pm     #   3 people liked this

Mariner posted at 04:33:31 PM on Dec 07, 2017:

Went to Phoenix 40yrs ago and couldn't wait to have a Coors. When people heard was from Ohio wanted to know if I had brought any Stroh's with me. Human nature I guess to want what we can't have.

I remember going to Michigan to buy Corona in the 80s. (And consume it there, of course.)

posted by justread on Dec 07, 2017 at 05:17:25 pm     #  

Foodie posted at 04:15:25 PM on Dec 07, 2017:
ahmahler posted at 03:46:46 PM on Dec 07, 2017:

Starting in 1970, Budweiser became the largest buyer of Rice in the US and that hasnít changed since. If you want to see what beer your father/ grandfather drink-grab a Strohís or PBR-while not great, they are, more or less, original recipe. Iím not ashamed to throw one of those back once in a while.

Haven't had a PBR in ages - not that I'm avoiding just that the opportunity hasn't presented itself.

I'll also throw back a Stroh's or two when working outside on a hot summer day. I'd agree. Pretty much tastes like it did 40 years ago.

How about Hamm's? Hamm's was a good lawn mowing beer.

posted by justread on Dec 07, 2017 at 05:17:59 pm     #  

I don't recall that I ever had Hamm's.

I grew up kinda in the country - edge of a small town with few neighbors. Across the field from our house was a small Hamm's beer warehouse/distribution center.

It was fenced in with about 10' high fencing with barbed wire on top. The fence alarm was constantly going off because people were trying to break in and snatch the beer. In the light of day I'd see a keg or two laying inside the fence. I don't think anyone ever managed to scurry off with any beer. The fact that a Michigan State Police post was within eye sight of the warehouse probably didn't help the would-be thieves.

Hey, back in the day, that passed for laughable entertainment.

posted by Foodie on Dec 07, 2017 at 07:17:02 pm     #  

Ho Jo hot dog and Little Kings Cream Ale ... go suck it hipsters

posted by justareviewer on Dec 07, 2017 at 08:31:05 pm     #   2 people liked this

The first beer I ever had was a "Goebel." My father used to drink it. I have fond memories of eating bbq and drinking a Goebel. I wish it was still sold as I would buy it for nostalgia sake.

posted by Dappling2 on Dec 07, 2017 at 09:13:08 pm     #  

"The mocking of domestic macro beers is disgustingly snootish."

Actually, the mockery is a fun sport.

I do the same thing for other common food items, such as bread, coffee, and pizza. I have my own definitions for what's "real", and most of the time, it involves making the products myself, including roasting my own coffee beans.

In my opinion, I make the best pizza and the best naturally leavened sourdough bread in the Toledo area. I'm 100 percent correct in my definitions, and most of the rest of you are wrong. That's not my problem. That's your problem.

Being a snobby-ass, authoritative-prick bastard is a blast.

Whether I'm serious or trolling is unknown.

But seriously, I support the small crafters for their quality, and hopefully, it encourages more people to make things. I believe that everyone should have at least one hobby that involves making something. Numerous organizations around here offer classes that teach how to make things.

It's impressive that a few passionate and fearless people who make products at home decide to start businesses, based around those products. Food and non-food related.

Some small businesses that make things have founders who are perfectionists and sticklers for extremely high quality. Snootish attitudes are probably a character trait for these founders, and I'll pay more their efforts.


"If it was good enough for my grandpa ..."

But when Grandpa was a youngster, more small breweries may have existed. Maybe a young Grandpa made his own wine.

Grandpa may have known how to do his own plumbing, electrical work, masonry work, or carpentry work around the home.

He may have bartered his woodworking skills for dairy products from a local farmer or for fiber from a small textile mill.

Maybe Grandpa knew how to sew and knit.

He may have performed all or most of the maintenance on his automobiles and small-engine devices. He might have had the attitude that if he wanted something done correctly, then he had to learn how to do it himself. Or maybe he couldn't afford to pay someone else to do the work.

Maybe Grandpa inherited tools and skills from his parents and grandparents.

Grandpa may have maintained his own produce garden that primarily grew heirloom plants. He may have collected the seeds in the fall to be used in the following year. He may have had a root cellar. (What the fuck is a root cellar?) And Grandpa did all the work required to maintain a decent-sized, organic produce garden while working a full-time job.

He may have bought produce from local farmers that used little to no chemicals. He may have canned some of his produce to enjoy in the winter and spring.

Maybe Grandpa supplemented the produce by fishing in an unpolluted stream. Maybe he hunted locally for squirrel, rabbit, and grouse before the habitat was destroyed by a housing development to be occupied by people fleeing cities.

Grandpa may have baked his own bread, or maybe he lived near a damn good bread baker. The wheat and other grains grown long ago may have been less genetically modified and better for human consumption.

He and the local butcher might have known each other on a first-name basis.

Grandpa probably ate real fucking eggs, drank real fucking milk, ate real fucking butter, and he may have cooked with real fucking lard.

He probably didn't know how to spell "vegan".

He may have had a job that involved a lot of physical activity, or at least at home, he didn't sit on his ass for four to six hours each day, mindlessly watching TV because he probably didn't have television when he was young, or he was busy with other activities.

In his little spare time, maybe Grandpa read books, wrote poetry, played board games, talked to friends in person, spent time with his family, or built something in his workshop. He might have listened to baseball on the radio, but he probably didn't get obnoxiously wound up if the team lost.

Long ago, they probably didn't have restaurants that advertised farm to table because that was the way a 20-something Grandpa lived in his home.

A young Grandpa might have been among the last generation to be surrounded by numerous, high quality, handmade, local products.

Now Grandpa goes to McDonald's in the morning to eat eggs and sausage, wearing an Under Armour shirt that a grandchild gifted to him on his birthday. C'est la vie.

Thankfully today, a tiny percentage of the population of all ages has an interest in the so-called "old" methods of producing things while at the same time embracing new technology when it's useful. They have an interest in less but better. They have an interest in high quality that may involve taking more time to make something.

When I'm around the home crafters who brew beer, sew, crochet, garden, make soap, make pottery, make leather products, etc., I learn that they enjoy making other things too, or they at least appreciate other crafts and the making processes of others. And they support those types of businesses when they can.

If all of that adds up to a snootish attitude, then I welcome a lot more of it.

posted by jr on Dec 07, 2017 at 11:31:26 pm     #   9 people liked this

JR-

I bake all my family's bread that we use - and I love doing it - but I have an absolutely terrible time keeping sourdough starters alive. I get it moving beautifully, keep it for a few weeks to mature on my counter and feed and discard and feed and discard and then move it to my fridge.... where I immediately forget about it for 6 months. :(

I've resurrected the same starter from dried bits I saved in the freezer probably 3 or 4 times now, and just can't get the habit moving to feed it weekly. Any tips? How do you handle that part?

posted by endcycle on Dec 08, 2017 at 01:07:22 pm     #  

Back on the subject.....beer was cold last night at Tin Can.....Found it interesting that they add 3.5% to your bill if you pay by credit card. Obviously recouping the $$ from the credit car fees.

posted by Hoops on Dec 08, 2017 at 01:51:03 pm     #  

endcycle, a firm starter with the consistency of dough does need fed or refreshed weekly. It's a pet. I feed it on the weekends. That's how I remember if I'm not baking regularly. Mine is nearly eight-years-old.

I mix flour, water, and some old starter. Dump and knead. Place in bowl to ferment for 6 to 10 hours, depending upon house temp. Then I place the new starter in a tightly-sealed plastic container, and I place the container in the fridge. Condensation will form on the inside of the container, and I will wipe up the water the next day if I remember.

If I know that I will be away for a while and I can't feed the starter when scheduled, then I bury the starter in flour in the container and place it in the fridge as before.

A starter that has the consistency of pancake batter can go several weeks or a few months between feedings. It will become beery and ugly, but after a couple feedings, all is well, apparently. This type of starter might be better for you.

Differen chemical or biological makeups exist between the starters. The liquidy starter can produce a more sour-tasting bread.

The San Francisco bakers like to use the liquidy starter. Zingerman's uses a firm starter, and that's what they taught in the class that I took.

The book titled Tartine Bread by Chad Robertson, a San Fran baker, is a good one for learning to use the liquidy or batter-like starter.

My favorite bread baking book is The Bread Builders: Hearth Loaves and Masonry Ovens by Alan Scott, Daniel Wind, Daniel Wing.

And books by Peter Reinhart are always good.

If you don't like maintaining any type of starter, then try the pre-ferment process. You create a batter-like mix, using flour, water, and instant yeast. That ferments overnight or longer if you wish. Then you use this mix in the bread recipe.

Zingerman's teaches a pre-ferment class. Using a poolish is a good way to make tasty bread without having to maintain a starter.

For the bread recipe, add some spelt flour, which has a sweet, nutty flavor. Spelt is low in gluten like rye. The bread will have less spring. I buy spelt flour at the Phoenix Earth Food Co-op.

posted by jr on Dec 08, 2017 at 05:52:32 pm     #  

Thanks JR - I use a preferment when I do bagels especially, and have read Reinhart - I love the bread baker's apprentice. :)

I'm pretty solid on the theory etc, it's just the HABIT of dealing with the starter that I keep blowing. I'll get there eventually. It's worth the effort and time for sure. Maybe I'll try to go with a lower hydration starter for a while, see if that helps me to maintain it.

I haven't tried spelt yet - might pick some up. Thanks for the tips!!

posted by endcycle on Dec 11, 2017 at 08:12:50 am     #  

Stopped by Tin Cup on Saturday night - 11ish.

Packed. Mainly a younger crowd - beer pong, connect 4, Jenga, Dart Boards. Great location when mud hens open up and they had 4 or 5 garage door style windows that I am sure will open in the summer. This place should do very well and fits the area.

posted by Xbuckeyex on Dec 11, 2017 at 09:59:17 am     #  

I would expected a crowd more like Kevin Costner at Tin Cup.

posted by justread on Dec 11, 2017 at 10:29:37 am     #